B.C. Premier John Horgan with Carole James, deputy premier and finance minister, fielded questions from the media concerning affordable housing, wildfires, speculation real estate tax, Nanaimo’s Discontent City and other issues during a brief press conference Wednesday morning at the Vancouver Island Conference Centre in Nanaimo. CHRIS BUSH/The News Bulletin

Premier and prime minister talk about competing priorities

Wildfires and other subjects discussed during meeting between Horgan and Trudeau in Nanaimo

A meeting between the prime minister and the B.C. premier focused on issues that the two levels of government can try to work on together over the short- and long-term.

Earlier this morning, Premier John Horgan spoke to reporters at the Vancouver Island Conference Centre, the site of a two-day federal cabinet ministers’ retreat. The premier shared some insight around the conversations he had with Justin Trudeau, whom he had met with yesterday evening in Nanaimo.

“We had an opportunity to talk about a range of issues,” Horgan said, adding that those issues ranged from wildfires, infrastructure and immigration strategy and the need for labour market workers.

“We have a skills shortage not just in B.C. but across the country,” Horgan said, adding that there is growing inequality across Canada.

Horgan did not say whether there had been discussions surrounding Discontent City or affordable housing with Trudeau. He said he hadn’t been to tent city, but said there are serious affordability and housing issues within the province.

“We have a housing crisis, an affordability crisis in British Columbia,” he said. “One of the primary focuses of Minister James’s first full budget in February was a 30-point plan on housing, which involved developing modular housing plan with cities.”

Horgan said it was unfortunate that politicians in Nanaimo couldn’t get on board with the province’s plan, making note that city councillors turned down $7 million in funding for a modular home site earlier this year.

“Unfortunately we weren’t able to get co-operation from the City of Nanaimo on taking us up on our offer of putting in place moduler housing for the hard to home,” he said. “With those units would come the services that people would need if they have mental health or addictions challenges, if they need work or help with resumé creation or access to the job market, so we are doing that in other cities around British Columbia as part of our modular housing plan.”

Horgan said he is “hopeful” the government can implement its plan in Nanaimo someday.

The premier also said with on the ongoing wildfire situation and other issues within the province, addressing the challenges of housing and affordability becomes even tougher.

“These are vexing challenges that I think … are all the more challenging when you consider the other issues that are facing us here at the moment,” he said.

RELATED: Premier and PM talk about competing priorities

RELATED: PM welcomed by premier, cabinet retreat in Nanaimo begins

When it came to the Trans Mountain pipeline, Horgan said the conversations with Trudeau were not “negotiations” but “acknowledgements” of differing viewpoints.

“We didn’t engage in that type of discussion today; that’s not to say we won’t in the future,” he said.

Following Horgan’s press conference, protesters gathered outside of the conference centre where they criticized Trudeau’s handling of the Trans Mountain pipeline. Nanaimo MP Sheila Malcolmson told reporters her party isn’t upset with Alberta, but with Trudeau for breaking promises.

“Promises have been broken on pipelines and people have not been heard,” she said.



nicholas.pescod@nanaimobulletin.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Young musicians to gather in Nanaimo for West Coast Youth Fiddle Summit

Fiddlers from B.C., Alberta and the Yukon to participate in second annual event

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Incentivize safer driving

We are effectively just socializing the cost of road accidents here, says letter writer

Lantzville opts against forming social media committee

Committee would have helped district council develop policy on social media behaviour

Nanaimo Hospital Auxiliary has been fundraising for 120 years

Hospital auxiliary president says group pioneered Wi-Fi at hospitals on Island

Gabriola Island community bus sees 100,000th rider

Gabriola Environmentally Responsible Trans-Island Express celebrated milestone Jan. 25

B.C. reports first coronavirus in Vancouver region

First patient visited Wuhan, China, reported symptoms

Opioid crisis to blame for shorter life expectancy in B.C. men, says Stats Can

Opioid crisis held responsible for declining life expectancy

Earthquake on top of highway closure a wake up call for Island’s West Coast

“When someone says, ‘Be prepared for 72 hours,’ that means exactly that: be prepared.”

Pregnant B.C. woman stuck in Wuhan, the epicentre of coronavirus outbreak

Woman is due to give birth in Wuhan, China unless she can get out

Taxi association asks B.C. Supreme Court to stop Uber, Lyft from operating

Petition alleges Passenger Transportation Board did not take taxis into account

Majority of Canadian boards had no female members in 2016 and 2017: StatCan

Statistics Canada says 18.1 per cent of director seats were held by women in 2017

Swapping grape varieties can help winemakers adapt to climate change: UBC study

Report says 56% of wine-grape-growing regions would be lost if global climate warms by 2 C

Alberta premier wants feds to approve Teck mine for benefit of First Nations

Kenney: ‘Surely [reconciliation] means saying yes to economic development for First Nations people’

Most Read