City’s hockey happenings stretch year-round

The Nanaimo Minor Hockey Association is also still making news. NMHA recently held its annual general meeting and awards night.

The calendar may say that summer is officially here, but it seems that news from the winter sport of hockey is almost always in season…

At the professional level, NHL playoffs finally came to an end this month with the unlikely crowning of the Los Angeles Kings as Stanley Cup winners. Not only was it the first championship in the 45 years of the franchise, but the Kings became the first No. 8 seed to win the cup.

There’s lots of pro hockey news still happening. The NHL entry draft got underway yesterday, teams will be looking to upgrade via the free agency market and the league’s awards were presented this week in Las Vegas.

On the local front, the Nanaimo Minor Hockey Association is also still making news. NMHA recently held its annual general meeting and awards night and my thanks to office administrator Vicky Long for passing along results.

Taking over from Dave Beatty as president of minor hockey for the coming year will be Roberta Bortolotto, with Dolf von Battenburg to be treasurer and Dawn Borelli returning as registrar. Other directors are Dave Bortolotto , Grant Klymchuk, Janelle Olson, Steve Paul, Allyson Pescesky, Andreas Hanus, Doug Tyce, Jody Windley, Karen vanGyzen, Kyla Becia, Kent Cookman and Sonia Branter.

In the awards portion of the AGM, recognition was given to recreational and competitive players, as well as coaches and officials. From boys’ teams, the Larry McNabb Memorial Trophy for the top graduating midget player went to Cole Musto. Mark Rudston-Brown received the Jason Gow Memorial Trophy as top graduating bantam player. Taking the award for graduating peewee player was Andrew Yurkiw, while Theo Christianson was chosen as top graduating atom player. Top graduating players from the female ranks were Madison Krassman from the midget division, Sarah Heller from bantam, Adelle Clark from peewee and Addison Battie from atom.

From the competitive division of minor hockey, the Eric Kneen Memorial Trophy for the top graduating player in the atom division was awarded to Ethan Jones. Receiving the Dick Robinson Memorial Trophy as top graduating peewee player was Joshua Mitchell. Patrick Bajkov took home the Don Sarkasian Memorial Trophy as top graduating bantam player and the Bud Dumont Award for the top graduating midget competitive player went to Jake Kaese.

Coaching awards saw the Ted Holder Memorial Trophy as most valuable coach in the competitive division won by Lee Pow. Most valuable coach from the midget division, receiving the Frank Crane Memorial Trophy, was Gerry Boutin. Rod Parker earned the President’s Trophy as most valuable coach in the bantam division, while the Civic Arena Trophy for the peewee division’s most valuable coach was awarded to Todd Sanderson. The Cliff McNabb Memorial Trophy for most valuable coach from the atom division was presented to Scott Christianson. Named as winners of Coach of the Year trophies were Sean Kraus from the initiation division, Peter Allen of the novice division and Kevin Branter from the female division.

Nanaimo Minor Hockey also recognized top officials at its AGM. As selected by a referees’ committee, the Most Improved Official was Trent Wright. Named as Rookie Official of the Year was Jeff Webb and chosen as Referee of the Year was Adam McDonald.

For information on Nanaimo minor hockey, call 250-754-5010.

Whatever your sport, a reminder in closing to play your hardest, play fair, and show good sportsmanship.

Ian Thorpe writes about sports Saturdays.

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