Despite Canada’s placing, Canadian fans showed their full support of the two day tournament

Canada falls short placing 14th overall in HSBC Canada Sevens

Richmond’s Nathan Hirayama lead the way with three tries and three conversions on day two for Canada

The sun rose high on Sunday, welcoming day two of the HSBC Canada Sevens rugby tournament at BC Place stadium in Vancouver.

After a disappointing loss to the U.S. on day one of the tournament Saturday, Canada finished third in pool A with a record of 1-1-1, and did not qualify for the Cup final portion of the tourney.

Although only the top two qualifiers from each pool qualified for Sunday’s quarter-finals, loyal Canadian fans did what they do best, and showed up in colour and forgiving spirit to see their team play in Sunday’s Challenge Trophy games.

Canada finished Sunday with a record of 1-2-0 after getting shut out 19-0 in their opening game against Scotland, beating France 31-19 and suffering a heartbraking 21-15 loss to Samoa. Canada finished 14th in the tournament on home soil.

Although the day began with their disappointing loss to Scotland, Canadian fans cheered on their team and held their heads high.

In their second game against France, Canada finally redeemed their place in the tournament.

Roaring fans welcomed two tries from Richmond’s own Nathan Hirayama, a try for John Moonlight and another try from Victoria’s finest, Connor Braid.

Hirayama stole the spotlight as he also added three conversions.

In Canada’s final game, they suffered an upsetting loss against Samoa during the 13-14 playoff game.

Canada led a close game 10-7 heading into the second half, and tension was high in the final seven minutes.

While captain and Vancouver native Harry Jones, Moonlight and Hirayama produced tries, Samoa kicked up the dust and left Canadian fans saddened with the 21-15 final score.

HSBC Sevens Series begins its next stop in Hong Kong, China from April 6-8. In sevens action, teams of seven players pay a pair of seven-minute halves, with a two-minute break. Traditional rugby sees teams of 15 players and 40-minutes halves.


@kieranroconnor
kieran.oconnor@bpdigital.ca

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