I would like to see more respect in the public discussion about concerns related to people experiencing homelessness and addictions, says letter writer. CHRIS BUSH/The News Bulletin

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR: People who are homeless need Nanaimo’s compassion

I would like to see more respect in the public discussion about people experiencing homelessness

To the editor,

Re: Homelessness spreads onto school grounds, Feb 27.

I am as weary as the next person about the excessive focus on political correctness in general. However, I would like to see more respect in the public discussion about concerns related to people experiencing homelessness and addictions. In the article, the labels “transients,” “the homeless” and “the homeless issue” were used. While perhaps a step up from ‘hobos’ or ‘bums,’ we can still improve in how we speak about our fellow community members.

Long ago, similar labels were used for others such as ‘the disabled,’ the insane,’ ‘lunatics’ or ‘addicts.’ Thankfully, people facing these challenges are now usually recognized as, first and foremost, people: people with disabilities, people with mental health issues, people with addictions. People first and, by the way, not ‘those people.’ Anyone could encounter such a challenge at some point.

J. McNeilly, Nanaimo

To the editor,

Re: Homelessness spreads onto school grounds, Feb 27.

Along with most of residents of Nanaimo, I care deeply about where we live and want a safe place for our kids to learn and play. Fundamental to our relationship with the place where we live is connection with the people who live here.

I am disappointed with the coverage of issues presented because of the lack of respect given to those people experiencing homelessness and addictions. To solve these challenges, we need compassion to identify and address the roots of the problems. This is essential, especially in school communities, where children are looking to educators and the wider community about how to respond to these challenges. Compassionate role modelling will foster future leaders who can meet these challenges with humanity and goodwill. Indeed, B.C.’s new curriculum has a focus on place-based learning which connects students with the land they live on and the people who leave near them (with and without homes). This curriculum recognizes the importance of relationships with land and people as foundational to learning and well-being.

Carrie Holt, Nanaimo

To the editor,

Re: Homelessness spreads onto school grounds, Feb 27.

Enough is enough Nanaimo. Why are we putting up with this? Why are we allowing this type of activity to continue? Most homeless people have made a decision to live this lifestyle. There are a few people who have mental health issues and have fallen through the cracks.

Somehow, over the past number of years, society has been duped by the ‘bleeding hearts’ into buying into feeling sorry for them and telling us that we need to put up with their living in our parks, malls and downtown, watching as criminal activity runs rampant and provide safe injection sites and not to do anything about it. I for one, find this to be ludicrous. There are laws that speak to theft, violence, drug activity, vagrancy and vandalism.

Citizens of Nanaimo please do your part. Call or write your members of city council, MLA, member of Parliament, Crime Stoppers and police department. Take our city back and make those in charge deal with it and clean up our city.

This situation is growing ever close to being at crisis mode. People are afraid or uncomfortable to venture to some parts of town or be on our streets at night. We are hounded constantly by people begging.

Let’s not be sheep, speak up and make Nanaimo safe and pristine again.

Gord Hall, Nanaimo


The views and opinions expressed in this letter to the editor are those of the author and do not reflect the views of Black Press or the Nanaimo News Bulletin. If you have a different view, we encourage you to write to us or contribute to the discussion below.

Just Posted

Prolific offender arrested in Nanaimo after sleeping in stolen car

Jackson Filgate, 34, of Nanaimo, faces stolen property, drug charges after being arrested Sept. 18

Councillor who resigned is ‘stronger now’ and is running again

Wendy Pratt is seeking election to Nanaimo city council

OPINION: Crowded ballot contains reasons to be encouraged

Somewhere within a list of 44 candidates, there’s a city council that can work in Nanaimo

Driver hurt in car crash in Cedar

A Honda Civic and a Ford truck with a camper collided Tuesday at Cedar, Harmac and Raines roads

Departure Bay school parents concerned about rotating learning space

Eco-school students being taught in library and picnic areas, say parents

Driver hurt in car crash in Cedar

A Honda Civic and a Ford truck with a camper collided Tuesday at Cedar, Harmac and Raines roads

Candidate lists finalized for Nanaimo, Lantzville, RDN, school district

Nomination deadline passes in advance of Oct. 20 local government elections

Porsche and Subaru dealerships can proceed with planning in north Nanaimo

City council unanimously allows rezoning application process to move forward

B.C. hockey product eyes shot at Olympic spot with China

Fletcher is one of 24 who travelled to Shenzhen, China for the first official Olympic dev camp.

B.C. cannabis producer Tilray hits at $20-billion high as stock price explodes

This is the first export of a cannabis product from a Canadian company to the U.S.

Are you feeling lazy? That’s OK – it’s just science

UBC study shows that humans are hardwired to prefer being sloth-like

LETTER: Who do we blame for the tragedy of Marrisa Shen’s death?

The B.C. girl was killed in a Burnaby park last July

Competition tribunal to hear B.C.-based case on airline food starting in October

The competition commissioner argued Vancouver airport authority had exploited its market position

Trudeau says Canada wants to see ‘movement’ before signing revised NAFTA deal

Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland is back in Washington in search of a way to bridge divide

Most Read