The sentence which was recommended by Crown counsel and imposed by the court could only be described as laughable, if only this were a laughing matter, says letter writer. (Photo submitted)

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: No justice in dog abuse case

For those of us who care about animal rights, where do we go from here, asks letter writer

To the editor

Re: B.C. woman banned from owning animals after horrific dog abuse case, Nov. 21.

In 2018, the SPCA attended a property in Duncan and found what they described as one of the most shocking cases of animal abuse in the 125-year history of the society. Teddy, a medium-sized dog, was tied on a rope which was only a few inches long and embedded into his neck, causing a massive infection. He was also severely emaciated and it required bolt cutters to free him. He died two days later.

Teddy’s owners were First Nations and public outrage over the incident prompted the chief and politicians to condemn what they described as racist backlash, urging the public to let the court do its job.

RELATED: B.C. woman banned from owning animals after horrific dog abuse case

RELATED: Vancouver Island man gets suspended sentence in Teddy the dog cruelty case

Last month, the court and Crown counsel did their jobs. Anderson Joe and Melissa Tooshley both received suspended sentences and a lifetime ban on owning animals. Given the fact that Criminal Code provisions make cruelty to animals punishable by up to five years imprisonment or a fine of up to $10,000 and that the SPCA described this as one of the worst cases of abuse ever perpetrated, the sentence which was recommended by Crown counsel and imposed by the court could only be described as laughable. If only this were a laughing matter.

The question for those of us who care about the rights and welfare of animals is, where do we go from here? We are reassured that animal abuse will be taken seriously. We are reassured that it is a criminal offence with serious penalties to punish and deter such conduct. Again and again and again, the system fails to treat such cruelty as anything more than a minor infraction barely worth the time and effort it took to prosecute it. Make no mistake about it, the Teddy saga is a complete and utter failure of justice.

I don’t know the answer to the question, where we go from here. But I now know, beyond the shadow of a doubt, what isn’t the answer.

Sharon Speevak, Nanaimo

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Report any instances of abuse


The views and opinions expressed in this letter to the editor are those of the writer and do not reflect the views of Black Press or the Nanaimo News Bulletin. If you have a different view, we encourage you to write to us or contribute to the discussion below.

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