Green Party MP Elizabeth May speaks with media during a news conference Wednesday June 3, 2020 in Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Greens call CERB fraud bill ‘wrong-headed’ as it fails to get support

Bill would bring in fines, possible jail time for people defrauding federal aid programs

By Carl Meyer, Local Journalism Initiative Reporter, National Observer

Greens and NDP MPs raised a series of concerns Wednesday about the effectiveness and scope of a Trudeau government bill that would fine or jail people who make fraudulent coronavirus benefits claims, and also enact new aid for Canadians with disabilities.

The government had hoped to debate the bill Wednesday. Government House leader Pablo Rodriguez said at a morning press conference he was “calling on the other parties to set politics aside.”

But throughout the day, all four opposition parties raised concerns with the bill’s contents, or the government’s approach to dealing with Parliament and Canadians this spring.

Without unanimous consent to allow the bill to be debated, it remained stuck at first reading on Wednesday, while the House of Commons adjourned until June 17.

During Wednesday’s sitting, Green Party parliamentary leader Elizabeth May said the bill, which was circulated to opposition members in draft form four days ago but had not been released publicly, was “unacceptable” and contained “flawed” measures.

“This is a wrong-headed approach to go after people and threaten them,” she said about the measures to crack down on fraudulent claims for the Canada Emergency Response Benefit (CERB). “It attempts to punish people instead of encouraging them.”

Green MP Paul Manly noted how it would provide a one-time payment of $600 to disability tax credit recipients. “People living on (Canada Pension Plan) disability in my riding are surviving on income that is below the poverty line,” he said.

“Many will not receive the one-time $600 payment because they do not receive the disability tax credit. This excludes many people who are struggling even before the COVID-19 pandemic.”

May and NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh both said the disability benefit package would only reach about 40 per cent of Canadians living with disabilities. May said this was due to the structure of the bill, which used the tax credit system to deliver the benefit.

READ MORE: Fines, punishment for CERB ‘fraudsters’, not people who made mistakes, Trudeau says

During the sitting, Singh challenged Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to propose a plan to cover the rest.

“The NDP seems to have decided that rather than help 40 per cent, or a significant proportion of people with disabilities, he wants to help none of them, because he’s not going to allow this debate to move forward on this bill,” Trudeau responded.

Singh also gave an example of an arts worker in Burnaby who he said had no forecast for his job to be reopened, and was dependent on CERB to continue. “We’re asking the prime minister to extend the CERB for families in need. Will the prime minister do that? Yes or no?” he said.

“We will continue to be there for Canadians in the right way. We are engaged with stakeholders, with opposition parties, with Canadians to ensure that we continue to support them the way they need to be,” said Trudeau.

Singh said later that it appeared the government was not even willing to meet him halfway.

The draft version of the bill also proposed expanding the government’s emergency wage subsidy program to include seasonal workers.

The government said it was hoping to use the anti-fraud measures to go after people looking to abuse the system, not those who have made honest mistakes.

Employment Minister Carla Qualtrough, who introduced the bill, also said the disability support payment would “complement a whole suite of measures” already in place, like benefits to students, children and GST payments.

“We want to deal with intentional fraudsters, people who are criminally taking advantage of seniors,” she said about the measures targeting CERB fraud.

Qualtrough added that “members of this House have brought to my attention” instances of fraud “and said `Please deal with these.”’

READ MORE: Extending CERB for months could double $60-billion budget, PBO report suggests

Rodriguez said the Liberals simply wanted to “work with our colleagues in the other parties to allow this legislation to be debated and voted on — just as we have done with the other bills throughout the spring.”

But Conservatives said they wanted the House of Commons to resume its full business duties instead of the format that has been used during the pandemic. And the Bloc Quebecois wanted the government to block political parties from taking advantage of the wage subsidy.

“The government has refused to allow this House to do work as it usually would,” said Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer.

Bloc Quebecois Leader Yves-Francois Blanchet also called on Trudeau to table a fiscal update, to understand where Canada was sitting after the rollout of hundreds of billions of dollars worth of emergency aid programs and other supports.

“It’s a pandemic. During a pandemic, you wear your mask over your mouth, not over your eyes,” he said.

After failing to obtain unanimous consent on the bill, the Liberals tried to split it into two bills, one that would deal with implementing the CERB penalties, and the other containing the financial aid measures, but that failed, too.

The Bloc then asked if the House could adjourn, but that didn’t work either.


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Want to support local journalism during the pandemic? Make a donation here.

Coronavirus

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Comments are closed

Just Posted

Car drives into utility pole in Nanaimo

Woman driving car reportedly not seriously injured

Nanaimo-Ladysmith school district considers COVID-19 lessons in planning for fall

Elementary, secondary school committees formed to plan for next school year

Infringing festival finds a way to dance during pandemic

Crimson Coast Dance Society holding drive-in, micro and physically distanced events July 10-19

Nanaimo sees Island’s first nurse practitioner primary care clinic

Nexus Primary Care Clinic opened in late June in south end

Nanaimo RCMP ask for help finding missing 19-year-old

Haley Murphy has not been seen since Tuesday, June 30, say police

Victoria man dies after skydiving incident in Nanoose Bay

34-year-old had made more than 1,000 jumps

RCMP searching for missing Langford teens in Cowichan Valley

Pair were headed to Lake Cowichan/Youbou area, last heard from in North Cowichan

Following incident at sea, fishing lodge says it will reopen despite Haida travel ban

QCL reopens July 10, says president; Haida chief councillor describes ‘dangerous’ boating encounter

Kamloops RCMP officer’s conduct under review after blackface jokes on social media

Meinke’s Instagram is private and it’s unclear when the posts were made

NHL says 35 players have tested positive for COVID-19 since June 8

Positive rate for the league is just under 6%

Man charged in Rideau Hall crash had rifle, shotguns, high-capacity magazine: RCMP

Hurren is accused of threatening to cause death or bodily harm to the prime minister

B.C. extends income assistance exemption for COVID-19

Provincial program to match Ottawa’s CERB, student pay

Most Read