A juvenile cougar has been destroyed by conservation officers in the Penticton area. (WildSafe BC photo)

A juvenile cougar has been destroyed by conservation officers in the Penticton area. (WildSafe BC photo)

Cougar destroyed in Penticton area after mauling dog, killing cat

This is the first reported incident with a cougar this year in the Penticton area

A juvenile cougar has been destroyed by conservation officers in the Penticton area after it mauled a dog and was seen with the remains of a house cat.

According to the Conservation Officer Service, a report came through Saturday afternoon of a cougar attacking an off-leash dog on a trail near Evergreen Drive.

Conservation Officer Clayton DeBruin explained that the juvenile cougar attacked the off-leash dog and attempted to take it away. The owner was able to fend off the cougar and retrieve their dog. However as they were returning to their vehicle the cougar followed them for upwards of a kilometre.

The dog was taken to the vet and is expected to recover.

A day later, the Conservation Officer Service received a report of a juvenile cougar laying under an RV in a townhouse complex on Green Avenue West.

After investigating, officers found that the cougar had the remains of a house cat with it.

“We knew that we were dealing with a cat (cougar) that had a pattern of taking domestic pets instead of sticking to its natural diet of deer and smaller wildlife,” said DeBruin. “We did have to remove that cat, for reasons of public safety and protection of private property.”

DeBruin reminded the public that during winter months, cougars are following deer populations into communities. He said it is normal to experience an increase in cougar activity during this time.

He encouraged those walking their dogs in heavily wooded areas to be aware of the possible presence of a cougar.

“A cougar may assess your dog as one of its natural prey species and so it’s important to keep those dogs on a leash,” said DeBruin.

“If you come across a cougar, the best thing you can do is maintain an assertive or aggressive stance, make yourself appear as big as possible, make noise, put your dog on a leash. If you have a smaller dog, pick it up and return to the nearest human-occupied area, all the while maintaining a visual of the cougar.”

So far this year there have been some sightings of cougars reported to the Conservation Officer Service, however this incident of the cougar being destroyed is the first reported incident with a cougar this year in the Penticton area.

If you observe a cougar within your community or observe cougars on trail networks displaying abnormal predatory behaviour, report it to the Report All Poachers and Polluters (RAPP) line at 1-877-952-7277.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Nanaimo Airport. (News Bulletin file photo)
Nanaimo Airport coping with low passenger counts, uncertain recovery

Airport CEO Dave Devana says it will take years to return to pre-pandemic passenger levels

Sophia Seward-Good and Aunalee Boyd-Good of Nanaimo’s Ay Lelum – The Good House of Design are showcasing their latest collection Yuxwule’ Sul’sul’tun – Eagle Spindle Whorl at Indigenous Fashion Week Toronto. (Photo courtesy Helena Lines)
Nanaimo’s Ay Lelum makes Indigenous Fashion Week Toronto debut

Clothing design company showing new collection, Yuxwule’ Sul’sul’tun – Eagle Spindle Whorl

Police in Nanaimo hope the public can help find Shawn Miller. (Photo submitted)
Nanaimo RCMP ask for help finding man missing since last week

Shawn Miller, 52, hasn’t been seen since Friday following days of erratic behaviour, say police

Beef to Halloween, a celebration of death, weapons, blood and murder. Halloween is a mockery of death and our beloved deceased. Why do we celebrate it?
Beefs & Bouquets, Nov. 25

To submit a beef or a bouquet to the Nanaimo News Bulletin, e-mail editor@nanaimobulletin.com

The City of Nanaimo is working on the 2021-25 financial plan, with a series of special finance and audit meetings this week and next week. (News Bulletin file photo)
City of Nanaimo begins budgeting with 3.3% tax increase as a starting point

Special finance and audit meeting being held today, Nov. 25

A man wearing a face mask to help curb the spread of COVID-19 walks in downtown Vancouver, B.C., Sunday, Nov. 22, 2020. The use of masks is mandatory in indoor public and retail spaces in the province. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
B.C. records deadliest day of pandemic with 13 deaths, 738 new COVID-19 cases

Number of people in hospital is nearing 300, while total cases near 30,000

(File photo)
Alberta woman charged after allegedly hitting boy with watermelon at Okanagan campsite

Police say a disagreement among friends at an Adams Lake campsite turned ugly

Court of Appeal for British Columbia in Vancouver. (File photo: Tom Zytaruk)
B.C. woman loses appeal to have second child by using late husband’s sperm

Assisted Human Reproduction Act prohibits the removal of human reproductive material from a donor without consent

Picture of two swans leaving the Cowichan estuary moments before one was shot out of the sky. (Submitted photo)
Petition to stop hunting in Cowichan estuary after swan shot

Hunters blame shooting on illegal poachers

A Nanaimo driver was sentenced Monday for fatally striking a high school student with his vehicle in 2019. (News Bulletin file photo)
Nanaimo driver sentenced after motor vehicle incident that killed teen last year

Brandon Geoffrey Murdoch fined and prohibited from driving for two years

B.C. projects targeting the restoration of sockeye salmon stocks in the Fraser and Columbia Watersheds will share in $10.9 million of federal funding to protect species at risk. (Kenny Regan photo)
13 projects protecting B.C. aquatic species at risk receive $11 million in federal funding

Salmon and marine mammals expected to benefit from ecosystem-based approach

Krista Macinnis displays the homework assignment that her Grade 6 daughter received on Tuesday. (Submitted photo)
B.C. mom angry that students asked to list positive stories about residential schools

Daughter’s Grade 6 class asked to write down 5 positive stories or facts

Most Read