Starting April 1, hunting grizzly bears will be banned in B.C. (Black Press files)

Ban on grizzly bear hunt, new rules take effect April 1

Taxidermists, tanners will have to report on any grizzly bears or parts brought to them

A ban on hunting grizzly bears in B.C. comes into effect next month, along with a number of regulatory changes.

The NDP government says taxidermists and tanners will be required to report information about any grizzly bears or parts brought to them as of April 1 to help enforce the hunting ban or face a $230 fine.

The province announced the ban in December to protect the roughly 15,000 grizzlies in the province — a move that was welcome by environmental groups.

The government previously said roughly 250 grizzlies were killed annually by non-First Nations hunters.

Hunters will now be required to carry all their species licences during hunting trips, including cancelled licences, and show them to conservation officers as requested.

The province says the changes to the Wildlife Act also increases the amount of edible meat hunters can collect from big game by including neck and rib meat.

Requirements to remove edible portions of an animal, which previously pertained to types of deer, moose, elk, sheep and goat, has been expanded to include cougars as well.

The Canadian Press

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