Baby boomers use twice as much electricity as millennials, BC Hydro says

The reasons millennials pull ahead on energy conservation may surprise you. Then again, they may not

Some baby boomers may think they’re superior to millennials when it comes to most aspects of life, but being energy-conscious isn’t one of them, according to BC Hydro.

Turns out, baby boomers use more than double the electricity than millennials, costing them about $500 more each year.

In a report released Friday, BC Hydro points out it’s in part because boomers typically have larger homes, more appliances and luxury amenities.

Roughly 40 per cent live in homes that are 2,000-square-feet or larger. That’s compared to 42 per cent of millennials who live in homes half that size, or less.

READ MORE: Do you leave the heat or the TV on for your pet when you’re not home?

Boomers are also twice as likely to have a swimming pool, and three times more likely to have a hot tub, while being 53 per cent more likely to have a wine or beer fridge, and 60 per cent more likely to have heated floors.

Aside from that, they also have more energy-consuming habits, BC Hydro said, including cooking dinner seven nights a week and still subscribing to cable TV.

“Between the TV, PVR and home theatre system, these items use significantly more electricity than the tablet or laptop that the majority of millennials use to stream shows and movies,” the report said.

The utility suggests using smaller appliances, such as microwaves and toaster ovens, which use 75 per cent less energy than an electric oven. Smart strips can also be used on older electronics to combat the energy used when they are on standby mode.


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

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