Maddi Corbett, left, and Emma Gouthro, Grade 5 students at Pleasant Valley Elementary School, are among those collecting coins for the Coins For Kids fundraiser. (KARL YU/News Bulletin)

Maddi Corbett, left, and Emma Gouthro, Grade 5 students at Pleasant Valley Elementary School, are among those collecting coins for the Coins For Kids fundraiser. (KARL YU/News Bulletin)

School kids supporting Coins for Kids

Pleasant Valley Elementary making change for charity

Students and staff at Pleasant Valley Elementary School are hoping to make change in time for the holiday season.

Donna Gannon, a Grade 5 teacher, says the school has been taking part in the fundraiser, benefiting the Boys and Girls Clubs of Central Vancouver Island and the Great Nanaimo Toy Drive, for about the last five years and is part of teaching students about giving.

“Each year at this time of year the kids are divided into clans and so one of the clan groups, their theme is generosity, so for the month of December, the school really focuses on how can we as a community be generous and so Coins for Kids has been one of the [charities] that we have continued to support over the years,” said Gannon.

Maddi Corbett and Emma Gouthro, Grade 5 students, say they have been doing a lot of fundraisers, including Coins for Kids, Salvation Army Nanaimo’s Christmas kettles and Everybody Deserves a Smile, which sees schools donating clothing and other items to people experiencing homelessness.

The two say there are jars in each classroom and students made posters to let the school know the fundraiser is on and anything helps.

“It doesn’t really matter how much you give because if everyone in Nanaimo gave a nickel then that would really help out people in need … so that’s pretty important,” said Corbett.

There are many ways to collect change, say the two students.

“I often go into my dad’s truck because, he’s like, ‘Oh yeah, I use this money for Tim Hortons,’ but I’m like, ‘I think people who don’t get Tim Hortons every day are a bit more important,’” said Corbett.

“I normally just go in my piggy bank because I just have a bunch of spare change in there, or I ask my parents,” said Gouthro. “I don’t really go searching in my house because I have no change lying around my house.”

Gannon said it is important to be generous given the time of year.

“I mean, we try to do it throughout the whole year as well, but just so that the kids realize that there are other kids out there that need the support,” said Gannon.

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reporter@nanaimobulletin.com

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