Science

A rockfish. Courtesy Central Coast Indigenous Resource Alliance.

Researchers uncover and map biological hotspots of B.C.’s Central Coast

Rich groups of rockfish, sponges and corals found, including in fjords and inland channels

 

Randy Enkin, geophysicist and president of Royal Astronomical Society of Canada’s Victoria Centre, has been cataloguing his observations of the moon for 30 years. He is the guest speeker at the Nanaimo Astronomy Society’s meeting Thursday, Nov. 25. (Photo courtesy Randy Enkin)

Moonstruck scientist will share his passion with Nanaimo Astronomy Society

Randy Enkin to speak about his 30 years of lunar observations

 

Mark Pathy is seen in his office with a model of the SpaceX starship in Montreal on Monday, November 8, 2021. Pathy is slated to embark in February on a 10-day journey on the maiden voyage of Texas-based Axiom Space paying about 50 million dollars US for the privilege. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

Private Canadian astronaut gears up for ‘pain’ experiments in space

Mark Pathy has boarded more than his share of vehicles. He rode…

 

(The Canadian Press photo)

An ocean menace: Study finds ghost gear capturing species at risk and lobster

‘We can actually make more money if we clean up our act’

(The Canadian Press photo)
The Sardinia Radio Telescope, located in Sardinia, Italy. Credit: S. Fatigoni et al (2021)

B.C. scientists capture most-detailed radio image of the Milky Way’s sister galaxy

Scientists first to create a radio image of the Andromeda Galaxy at the microwave frequency of 6.6 GHz

The Sardinia Radio Telescope, located in Sardinia, Italy. Credit: S. Fatigoni et al (2021)
Bill Merilees, a retired B.C. Parks regional information officer, collected mollusk shells from B.C. and Washington state coastlines for 50 years and has donated his 140,000-specimen collection to University of British Columbia’s Beaty Biodiversity Museum. (Chris Bush/News Bulletin)

Nanaimo man donates 140,000 mollusk specimens to biodiversity museum

UBC’s Beaty museum grateful for Bill Merilees’s historical record of B.C. marine biodiversity

Bill Merilees, a retired B.C. Parks regional information officer, collected mollusk shells from B.C. and Washington state coastlines for 50 years and has donated his 140,000-specimen collection to University of British Columbia’s Beaty Biodiversity Museum. (Chris Bush/News Bulletin)
The Greenwich peninsula portion of Prince Edward Island National Park is seen on Tuesday, Aug. 29, 2017. A new report says Canada could reach one-third of its greenhouse gas reduction targets by making better use of its vast forests, prairies and wetlands. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan

Study outlines ‘natural climate solutions’ to help Canada meet emissions targets

Report lists 24 nature-based ways for Canada to help cut carbon emissions by 78 million tonnes

The Greenwich peninsula portion of Prince Edward Island National Park is seen on Tuesday, Aug. 29, 2017. A new report says Canada could reach one-third of its greenhouse gas reduction targets by making better use of its vast forests, prairies and wetlands. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan
Mandy Hobkirk, Biosphere-wide Blitz organizer and Mount Arrowsmith Biosphere Region coordinator, says BioBlitz data is used to examine the biodiversity and species richness of an area, and to see if there are changes over time such as fluctuations in populations or increases in invasive species. (Vancouver Island University photo)

Citizen scientists asked to look for bugs and birds in upcoming ‘BioBlitz’

VIU-based researchers studying biodiversity on the mid Island

Mandy Hobkirk, Biosphere-wide Blitz organizer and Mount Arrowsmith Biosphere Region coordinator, says BioBlitz data is used to examine the biodiversity and species richness of an area, and to see if there are changes over time such as fluctuations in populations or increases in invasive species. (Vancouver Island University photo)
SpaceX space junk burning in night’s sky on March 25, 2021. (screenshot of u/ArcMaster video/Reddit)

VIDEO: SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket debris spotted burning in night’s sky

Hundreds took to social media showing videos and photos of Elon Musk’s space project

SpaceX space junk burning in night’s sky on March 25, 2021. (screenshot of u/ArcMaster video/Reddit)
The Youth Innovation Showcase offers young people an avenue to showcase their innovations virtually and to network with some of the top players in the tech world.

Youth Innovation Showcase demonstrates innovative spirit of BC and Yukon

Annual competition gives young people a chance to win one of three $5,000 prizes

  • Mar 23, 2021
The Youth Innovation Showcase offers young people an avenue to showcase their innovations virtually and to network with some of the top players in the tech world.
An artist’s rendering depicts the James Webb Space Telescope in operation. The JWST will be launched in October and will augment and eventually take over from the Hubble Space Telescope, which has been in operation since 1990. (Image courtesy Northrop Grumman. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/)

Space telescope scientist featured at next Nanaimo Astronomy Society meeting

Chris Willott will explain systems and science behind the world’s most sophisticated space telescope

An artist’s rendering depicts the James Webb Space Telescope in operation. The JWST will be launched in October and will augment and eventually take over from the Hubble Space Telescope, which has been in operation since 1990. (Image courtesy Northrop Grumman. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/)
A Pacific great blue heron preys on a juvenile salmon in Cowichan Bay. A new study out of UBC suggests the birds removed between three and six per cent of the young fish every year from the Salish Sea region. (Photo supplied by Robert Stenseth)

Blue herons identified as a significant predator of B.C.’s juvenile salmon

Surprising UBC findings may actually be beneficial to stability of salmon populations

A Pacific great blue heron preys on a juvenile salmon in Cowichan Bay. A new study out of UBC suggests the birds removed between three and six per cent of the young fish every year from the Salish Sea region. (Photo supplied by Robert Stenseth)
The humanoid sensing robot has a 3D printed finger cap that measures oxygen levels. (Dr. Woo Soo Kim)

Medical care robots being made with 3D origami in B.C. lab

Would you let a robot take your temperature?

The humanoid sensing robot has a 3D printed finger cap that measures oxygen levels. (Dr. Woo Soo Kim)
Rob Rondeau, PhD candidate at SFU, is embarking on a mission to find definitive evidence of human migration to the continent. (SFU supplied image)

VIDEO: Marine archaeologist looking for clues of ancient migration in B.C. waters

SFU researcher hoping to find 15,000 year-old archaeological sites underwater

Rob Rondeau, PhD candidate at SFU, is embarking on a mission to find definitive evidence of human migration to the continent. (SFU supplied image)
Cam Wipper, an astronomer with the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, will talk about how his career took him from Vancouver Island to the big island of Hawaii at Nanaimo Astronomy Society’s upcoming monthly meeting. (Photo submitted)

Astronomer from Nanaimo part of exciting discoveries at Hawaii observatories

Cam Wipper will share stories from his professional career at next Nanaimo Astronomy Society meeting

Cam Wipper, an astronomer with the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, will talk about how his career took him from Vancouver Island to the big island of Hawaii at Nanaimo Astronomy Society’s upcoming monthly meeting. (Photo submitted)
A trail camera photo of a wolverine in B.C.’s Shuswap region. (Photo courtesy Grant Hiebert)

VIU research disproves existence of Vancouver Island wolverine

Wolverines from the Island found to be largely indistinct from mainland counterparts

A trail camera photo of a wolverine in B.C.’s Shuswap region. (Photo courtesy Grant Hiebert)
The top part of the fossil burrow, seen from the side, with feathery lines from the disturbance of the soil – thought to be caused by the worm pulling prey into the burrow. (Paleoenvironntal Sediment Laboratory/National Taiwan University)

PHOTOS: SFU researchers find evidence of ‘giant’ predatory worms on ocean floor

Fossils found the prove the existence of an ancient Taiwanese worm as long as two metres

The top part of the fossil burrow, seen from the side, with feathery lines from the disturbance of the soil – thought to be caused by the worm pulling prey into the burrow. (Paleoenvironntal Sediment Laboratory/National Taiwan University)
Southern resident killer whales in B.C. waters. Research shows the population’s females are more negatively influenced by vessel traffic than males. (Photo supplied by Ocean Wise Conservation Association)

Female orcas less likely to feed in presence of vessel traffic: study

Research the southern resident population raises concerns over reproduction capacity

Southern resident killer whales in B.C. waters. Research shows the population’s females are more negatively influenced by vessel traffic than males. (Photo supplied by Ocean Wise Conservation Association)
An 18-year old male southern resident killer whale, J34, is stranded near Sechelt in 2016. A postmortem examination suggests he died from trauma consistent with a vessel strike. (Photo supplied by Paul Cottrell, Fisheries and Oceans Canada)

“We can do better” — humans the leading cause of orca deaths: study

B.C. research reveals multitude of human and environmental threats affecting killer whales

An 18-year old male southern resident killer whale, J34, is stranded near Sechelt in 2016. A postmortem examination suggests he died from trauma consistent with a vessel strike. (Photo supplied by Paul Cottrell, Fisheries and Oceans Canada)
This undated photo provided by Caltech shows a STARE2 station made by radio astronomer Christopher Bochenek at the Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex in California. On Wednesday, Nov. 5, 2020, astronomers say they used this system and a Canadian observatory to trace an April 2020 fast cosmic radio burst to our own galaxy and a type of powerful energetic young star called a magnetar. (Caltech via AP)

Flash of luck: Astronomers find cosmic radio burst source

Tracked that fast radio burst to a weird type of star called a magnetar that’s 32,000 light-years from Earth

This undated photo provided by Caltech shows a STARE2 station made by radio astronomer Christopher Bochenek at the Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex in California. On Wednesday, Nov. 5, 2020, astronomers say they used this system and a Canadian observatory to trace an April 2020 fast cosmic radio burst to our own galaxy and a type of powerful energetic young star called a magnetar. (Caltech via AP)