First Nations

Terry Teegee, regional Chief of the B.C. Assembly of First Nations speaks at a meeting between Canada's premiers and Indigenous leaders at the Songhees Wellness Centre on July 1. (Jake Romphf/News Staff)

New First Nations centre coming to B.C. to give economic development guidance

Centre will look at how to better benefit from sectors such as forestry, mining and natural gas

Terry Teegee, regional Chief of the B.C. Assembly of First Nations speaks at a meeting between Canada's premiers and Indigenous leaders at the Songhees Wellness Centre on July 1. (Jake Romphf/News Staff)
“A Mother’s Cry” is so revered in Nisga’a culture that only the Gitmaxmak’ay Nisga’a Society dancers are permitted to perform musical narration, as seen at Salmon Fest in June 2022.

‘A Mothers Cry’ heard across B.C.’s northwest captures the pain of separation and loss

Hallowed Nisga’a song shares the anguish of stolen children and mothers’ arms left empty

“A Mother’s Cry” is so revered in Nisga’a culture that only the Gitmaxmak’ay Nisga’a Society dancers are permitted to perform musical narration, as seen at Salmon Fest in June 2022.
Orange Shirt Day founder Phyllis Webstad from the Stswecem’c Xgat’tem First Nation lives in Williams Lake, B.C. (Monica Lamb-Yorski photo - Williams Lake Tribune)

Orange Shirt Society founder hopeful for future of Indigenous families

B.C.’s Phyllis Webstad will be at Niagara Falls for National Day for Truth and Reconciliation

Orange Shirt Day founder Phyllis Webstad from the Stswecem’c Xgat’tem First Nation lives in Williams Lake, B.C. (Monica Lamb-Yorski photo - Williams Lake Tribune)
A totem at the top of the Malahat that had been vandalized has now been replaced. (Photo courtesy of City of Duncan)

Salish Bear Totem returned to Malahat summit

Totem set on fire last year

A totem at the top of the Malahat that had been vandalized has now been replaced. (Photo courtesy of City of Duncan)
B.C. premier John Horgan, left, and five ministers met with the Tŝilhqot’in Nation in the Xeni Gwet’in caretaker area Sept. 21 and 22. (B.C. government photo)

Tŝilhqot’in title lands crux of two-day meeting with Indigenous leaders, premier, ministers

Premier John Horgan, five ministers met with the Tŝilhqot’in Nation at Nemiah Valley Lodge

B.C. premier John Horgan, left, and five ministers met with the Tŝilhqot’in Nation in the Xeni Gwet’in caretaker area Sept. 21 and 22. (B.C. government photo)
Quatsino First Nation’s community hall was full on Tuesday evening as BHP made a public apology to the nation regarding the Island Copper Mine’s operations. (Tyson Whitney - North Island Gazette)

Global firm apologizes to B.C. First Nation for damage caused by copper mine

Decommissioned open pit mine was located in Quatsino First Nation traditional territory

Quatsino First Nation’s community hall was full on Tuesday evening as BHP made a public apology to the nation regarding the Island Copper Mine’s operations. (Tyson Whitney - North Island Gazette)
Intensive Support & Resource worker Nick Bello, (left), Pat Giasson (team leader Youth Probation - MCFD); Jaylene Thompson; Trevin Charlie, Shayla Malloway-Seward, and Envy Malloway-Seward.

Mentorship program for Stó:lō youth comes of age after a decade

‘Indigenous grad rates in Chilliwack went from 55% to 79%’ due to programs like Mémiyelhtel

Intensive Support & Resource worker Nick Bello, (left), Pat Giasson (team leader Youth Probation - MCFD); Jaylene Thompson; Trevin Charlie, Shayla Malloway-Seward, and Envy Malloway-Seward.
Apprentice carver Rey Dickie and master carver Stan Hunt stand next to the log that will be carved into a monument to remember Indigenous children who died at residential schools. (Tyson Whitney - North Island Gazette)

B.C. carvers creating monument to children found in unmarked residential school graves

Monument will be toured across Vancouver Island before being shipped to Vancouver

Apprentice carver Rey Dickie and master carver Stan Hunt stand next to the log that will be carved into a monument to remember Indigenous children who died at residential schools. (Tyson Whitney - North Island Gazette)
Some of the mountain bikers attending the Jesmond trail grand opening on Aug. 27 and the Rocky Mountain Bicycles demo team at the Big Bar Ranch, where many were camped to celebrate the trail opening event. (Ruth Lloyd photo - Black Press Media)

Trail opening spiritually and economically important moment for southern Cariboo First Nation

Stswecem’c Xget’tem First Nation celebrated mountain bike trail development at Jesmond Mountain

Some of the mountain bikers attending the Jesmond trail grand opening on Aug. 27 and the Rocky Mountain Bicycles demo team at the Big Bar Ranch, where many were camped to celebrate the trail opening event. (Ruth Lloyd photo - Black Press Media)
Snaw-Naw-As Chief Gordon Edwards tosses the ball to get the children to start playing on its new mini soccer pitch. (Michael Briones photo)

Whitecaps FC members on hand as Snaw-Naw-As First Nation unveils special mini soccer pitch

Hope and Health wants to establish pitches in 6 Indigenous communities.

Snaw-Naw-As Chief Gordon Edwards tosses the ball to get the children to start playing on its new mini soccer pitch. (Michael Briones photo)
Sonny McHalsie, a Stó:lō historian, with Bad Rock (Xéylxelamós) behind him, a sacred transformation site on the Fraser River, also known as Lady Franklin Rock, near Yale. Recently 45 sacred sites of the Stó:lō have gained legal protection. (Jennifer Feinberg/ Chilliwack Progress file)

Landmark agreement to protect 45 sacred sites across Stó:lō territory a first for B.C.

‘This is a major step forward for First Nations heritage conservation in B.C,’ says Stó:lō chief

Sonny McHalsie, a Stó:lō historian, with Bad Rock (Xéylxelamós) behind him, a sacred transformation site on the Fraser River, also known as Lady Franklin Rock, near Yale. Recently 45 sacred sites of the Stó:lō have gained legal protection. (Jennifer Feinberg/ Chilliwack Progress file)
Fieldwork undertaken by Kitselas Geothermal to explore the feasibility of a geothermal power project at Lakelse Lake. (Photo courtesy Kitselas Geothermal)

Shell Canada signs deal with Kitselas Geothermal in northwest B.C.

Energy giant invests in Lakelse Lake geothermal potential

Fieldwork undertaken by Kitselas Geothermal to explore the feasibility of a geothermal power project at Lakelse Lake. (Photo courtesy Kitselas Geothermal)
Stz’uminus canoe racing action last summer. (Photo by Duck Paterson)

Canoe races in Ladysmith set for Labour Day weekend

Stz’uminus seeking sponsor support for annual event

Stz’uminus canoe racing action last summer. (Photo by Duck Paterson)
(Photo submitted via The Canadian Press)

B.C. First Nation in Scotland asking museum to return totem pole taken in 1929

Nisga’a First Nation says the pole was stolen while members were away hunting and harvesting

(Photo submitted via The Canadian Press)
Ivan Wells Jr. checks the waves from outside Mułaa headquarters. (Nora O’Malley photo)

Introducing Mułaa, Canada’s rising tide Indigenous surf team

Wavebreaking club designed to reconnect Vancouver Island’s First Nations youth with the water

Ivan Wells Jr. checks the waves from outside Mułaa headquarters. (Nora O’Malley photo)
Nanaimo Aboriginal Centre has changed focus and is now known as Island Urban Indigenous Wellness Society. Pictured are director Alexis Petersen, left, and president Claire Clark. (Karl Yu/News Bulletin)

Nanaimo Aboriginal Centre rebrands, hopes to regain trust of area First Nations

New Island Urban Indigenous Wellness Society wants to distance itself from past leadership

Nanaimo Aboriginal Centre has changed focus and is now known as Island Urban Indigenous Wellness Society. Pictured are director Alexis Petersen, left, and president Claire Clark. (Karl Yu/News Bulletin)
Jeneva Touchie points to a new bilingual Nuu-chah-nulth / English street sign across from the high school. The District of Ucluelet hosted a small gathering on July 29 to unveil the new bilingual sign, which will be one of many installed around town over the next few months. (Nora O’Malley photo)

Ucluelet unveils new bilingual Nuu-chah-nulth / English street signs

“Our bilingu̓al street sign project is a small way we can honour the Yuułuʔiłʔatḥ people”

Jeneva Touchie points to a new bilingual Nuu-chah-nulth / English street sign across from the high school. The District of Ucluelet hosted a small gathering on July 29 to unveil the new bilingual sign, which will be one of many installed around town over the next few months. (Nora O’Malley photo)
Marchers proceed from the bottom of Oak Street. (Photo by Don Bodger)

Hundreds gather for Island First Nation’s March For The Children

Occasion honours residential school survivors and those who never made it home

Marchers proceed from the bottom of Oak Street. (Photo by Don Bodger)
Christine Thomas addresses the crowd, with the old playground in the background. (Photo by Don Bodger)
Christine Thomas addresses the crowd, with the old playground in the background. (Photo by Don Bodger)
Grand Chief Stewart Phillip, president of the UBCIC, left, June North, widow of the man who died by suicide and Williams Lake First Nation Chief Willie Sellars all spoke during a press conference held Tuesday, July 19. (Monica Lamb-Yorski photo - Williams Lake Tribune)

‘In shock and mourning’: Indigenous leaders demand inquiry into fatal RCMP incident

Incident of man threatening self harm in Williams Lake ended tragically July 10

Grand Chief Stewart Phillip, president of the UBCIC, left, June North, widow of the man who died by suicide and Williams Lake First Nation Chief Willie Sellars all spoke during a press conference held Tuesday, July 19. (Monica Lamb-Yorski photo - Williams Lake Tribune)