Coronavirus

People participate in the annual Women’s Memorial March in Vancouver, B.C., Sunday, Feb. 14, 2021. The second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic did not stop a rising tide of reports of domestic violence, experts say, warning that the stress of life in lockdown continues to put victims at risk. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Reports of domestic, intimate partner violence continue to rise during pandemic

Call volumes spiked almost immediately when swaths of Canada first locked down

People participate in the annual Women’s Memorial March in Vancouver, B.C., Sunday, Feb. 14, 2021. The second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic did not stop a rising tide of reports of domestic violence, experts say, warning that the stress of life in lockdown continues to put victims at risk. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Calgary city councillor George Chahal in the Skyview Ranch community in Calgary, Alta., Saturday, Jan. 30, 2021.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

A rural-urban divide: Data gives most detailed look yet at where CERB went

There still is a need in many areas for government aid like the federal recovery benefits

Calgary city councillor George Chahal in the Skyview Ranch community in Calgary, Alta., Saturday, Jan. 30, 2021.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
A Wealthsimple Trade app icon is shown on a smartphone on Tuesday, Dec. 15, 2020. Some stock trading platforms say usership has spiked in 2020, as a whipsawing stock market and more time at home has Canadians day trading. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jesse Johnston

Overheated stock market at risk of bubble in a disconnect from economy, experts say

Canada’s unemployment rate climbed to 9.6 per cent in January as 212,800 jobs were erased that month

A Wealthsimple Trade app icon is shown on a smartphone on Tuesday, Dec. 15, 2020. Some stock trading platforms say usership has spiked in 2020, as a whipsawing stock market and more time at home has Canadians day trading. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jesse Johnston
Members of the Canadian Armed Forces march during the Calgary Stampede parade in Calgary, Alta., Friday, July 8, 2016. The Canadian Armed Forces is facing a shortfall of several thousand troops thanks at least in part to challenges training new recruits during the COVID-19 pandemic. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

Canadian military short thousands of troops as COVID-19 impedes training efforts

The Canadian Armed Forces were short about 2,000 regular force members and 5,000 reservists

Members of the Canadian Armed Forces march during the Calgary Stampede parade in Calgary, Alta., Friday, July 8, 2016. The Canadian Armed Forces is facing a shortfall of several thousand troops thanks at least in part to challenges training new recruits during the COVID-19 pandemic. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
FILE - Buffalo Sabres head coach Ralph Krueger looks on in the first period of an NHL hockey game against the Colorado Avalanche Wednesday, Feb. 26, 2020, in Denver. Krueger marked his return to practice Sunday, feb. 14, 2021 with an upbeat but cautionary message following a 10-day bout with what he called “moderately severe symptoms” of COVID-19. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, file)

NHL adapts COVID-19 approach through 1st month of season

The decision to add rapid tests came after a player was pulled mid-game as a result of a positive test.

FILE - Buffalo Sabres head coach Ralph Krueger looks on in the first period of an NHL hockey game against the Colorado Avalanche Wednesday, Feb. 26, 2020, in Denver. Krueger marked his return to practice Sunday, feb. 14, 2021 with an upbeat but cautionary message following a 10-day bout with what he called “moderately severe symptoms” of COVID-19. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, file)
A vial of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine is shown at a UHN COVID-19 vaccine clinic in Toronto on Thursday, January 7, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

Feds expect Pfizer to start ramping up vaccine deliveries to Canada this week

Canada’s vaccination efforts slowed to a crawl as Pfizer upgraded its plant in Belgium

A vial of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine is shown at a UHN COVID-19 vaccine clinic in Toronto on Thursday, January 7, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
The United States border crossing is seen Friday, March 20, 2020, in Lacolle, Que. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz
The United States border crossing is seen Friday, March 20, 2020, in Lacolle, Que. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz
Barbara, left, and Marissa Barnartt pose for a photo outside their condo building in Thornhill, Ont. on Wednesday, February 10, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

COVID-19 brings some families closer together, as bonds strengthen in times of crisis

‘I didn’t realize how much all these people meant to me’

Barbara, left, and Marissa Barnartt pose for a photo outside their condo building in Thornhill, Ont. on Wednesday, February 10, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young
Members of the Canadian Armed Forces march during the Calgary Stampede parade in Calgary, Alta., Friday, July 8, 2016. The Canadian Armed Forces is facing a shortfall of several thousand troops thanks at least in part to challenges training new recruits during the COVID-19 pandemic. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

Canadian military short thousands of troops as COVID-19 impedes recruitment, training

The pandemic has exacerbated a long-standing problem for the military

Members of the Canadian Armed Forces march during the Calgary Stampede parade in Calgary, Alta., Friday, July 8, 2016. The Canadian Armed Forces is facing a shortfall of several thousand troops thanks at least in part to challenges training new recruits during the COVID-19 pandemic. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
Lynda Hartman, 75, visits her 77-year-old husband, Len Hartman, in a “hug tent” set up outside the Juniper Village assisted living center in Louisville, Colo., on Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021. (AP Photo/Thomas Peipert)

VIDEO: ‘Hug tent’ provides safe embraces at U.S. elderly home

Since the pandemic hit, similar tents have popped up around the country and in places like Brazil

Lynda Hartman, 75, visits her 77-year-old husband, Len Hartman, in a “hug tent” set up outside the Juniper Village assisted living center in Louisville, Colo., on Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021. (AP Photo/Thomas Peipert)
Dr. Bonnie Henry gives her daily media briefing regarding COVID-19 for the province of British Columbia in Victoria, B.C., Monday, December 7, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Judge questions court role in managing B.C. health orders banning church gatherings

The court is ‘rather ill equipped’ to second-guess health decisions by experts equipped to make them

Dr. Bonnie Henry gives her daily media briefing regarding COVID-19 for the province of British Columbia in Victoria, B.C., Monday, December 7, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
A long-term seniors’ care health-care worker receives the vaccine at a clinic on Vancouver Island last month. (Island Health photo)

Editorial: Patience required as we wait in vaccination line

Delays have caused some shuffling of plans, but deliveries of doses are on the way

A long-term seniors’ care health-care worker receives the vaccine at a clinic on Vancouver Island last month. (Island Health photo)
Dr. Bonnie Henry speaks about the province’s COVID-19 vaccine plans during a news conference at the legislature in Victoria, Friday, Jan. 22, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito

B.C.’s top doctor says Nigerian variant identified in the province

Of 47 cases of COVID-19 variants identified in the province, one is believed to be linked to Nigeria

Dr. Bonnie Henry speaks about the province’s COVID-19 vaccine plans during a news conference at the legislature in Victoria, Friday, Jan. 22, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
Brucejack mine in northwestern B.C. is the latest site of an industrial cluster of COVID-19 cases. (Smithers Interior News)

Northern B.C. gold mine latest industrial site to deal with COVID-19

B.C. reports 445 more coronavirus cases province-wide Friday

Brucejack mine in northwestern B.C. is the latest site of an industrial cluster of COVID-19 cases. (Smithers Interior News)
Vancouver Island University is one of the post-secondary institutions in B.C. expecting operating deficits this year and next year. (Nanaimo Bulletin)

B.C. colleges, universities allowed to run COVID-19 deficits

Falling revenue, rising costs mean red ink for 20 institutions

Vancouver Island University is one of the post-secondary institutions in B.C. expecting operating deficits this year and next year. (Nanaimo Bulletin)
B.C. Supreme Court in Vancouver on Tuesday December 11, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

UPDATED: Lawyers spar over injunction against Fraser Valley churches defying COVID health orders

A judge is hearing arguments Friday morning in Vancouver Supreme Court

B.C. Supreme Court in Vancouver on Tuesday December 11, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Tails of Air Transat and an Air Canada aircraft are seen on the tarmac at Montreal-Trudeau International Airport, in Montreal, Wednesday, April 8, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

Stricter border controls for travellers to begin Feb. 22

More details of how that will work and who will be covered will come later today

Tails of Air Transat and an Air Canada aircraft are seen on the tarmac at Montreal-Trudeau International Airport, in Montreal, Wednesday, April 8, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson
Nanaimo District Secondary School. (News Bulletin file photo)

Fire drill at NDSS didn’t spread COVID-19, says school district

Cases reported at Nanaimo District Secondary, but no transmission of virus there

Nanaimo District Secondary School. (News Bulletin file photo)
Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller echoed this call for continued vigilance Thursday as his department reported that the number of people with COVID-19 in First Nations communities has declined to the lowest point since Dec. 6, with 1,869 active cases reported as of Wednesday. (THE CANADIAN PRESS)

Feds call for continued vigilance as Canada sees 30% drop in COVID cases

Public health experts say the slowdown has led to a gradual decline in severe COVID-19 outcomes

Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller echoed this call for continued vigilance Thursday as his department reported that the number of people with COVID-19 in First Nations communities has declined to the lowest point since Dec. 6, with 1,869 active cases reported as of Wednesday. (THE CANADIAN PRESS)
Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry updates B.C.’s COVID-19 situation at the legislature, Jan. 11, 2021. (B.C. government)

Another 449 cases of COVID-19 in B.C. for Thursday

Situation improving for long-term care homes

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry updates B.C.’s COVID-19 situation at the legislature, Jan. 11, 2021. (B.C. government)