Astronomy

Science communicator Matthew S. Williams will explore the growing importance of making science accessible to the general public in a time of misinformation and ‘data fatigue’ at the Nanaimo Astronomy Society’s meeting Thursday, Sept. 23. (Photo submitted)

Nanaimo Astronomy Society’s first meeting of the fall focuses on science communication

Guest speaker Matthew S. Williams will talk about making science accessible

 

Randy Enkin, president of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada Victoria, uses a sextant, a tool used to determine angles between the horizon and a celestial body such as a star. (Photo by Eva Bild)

Weather poised to present ideal Perseid meteor shower for viewers

Seek dark skies away from city areas for best views, astronomer says

 

John A. Read, who was inspired to leave his former career to become a professional astronomer by the purchase of a $13 telescope, will give beginning astronomers key pointers on how to set up and get the best performance from their instruments at Nanaimo Astronomy Society’s meeting June 24. (Photo courtesy Jennifer Read)

Astrophysicist will talk about getting the most out of a telescope at Nanaimo astronomy meeting

John Read’s purchase of a $13 telescope led to a degree in astrophysics and a career in astronomy

 

An artist’s rendering depicts the James Webb Space Telescope in operation. The JWST will be launched in October and will augment and eventually take over from the Hubble Space Telescope, which has been in operation since 1990. (Image courtesy Northrop Grumman. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/)

Space telescope scientist featured at next Nanaimo Astronomy Society meeting

Chris Willott will explain systems and science behind the world’s most sophisticated space telescope

An artist’s rendering depicts the James Webb Space Telescope in operation. The JWST will be launched in October and will augment and eventually take over from the Hubble Space Telescope, which has been in operation since 1990. (Image courtesy Northrop Grumman. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/)
Cam Wipper, an astronomer with the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, will talk about how his career took him from Vancouver Island to the big island of Hawaii at Nanaimo Astronomy Society’s upcoming monthly meeting. (Photo submitted)

Astronomer from Nanaimo part of exciting discoveries at Hawaii observatories

Cam Wipper will share stories from his professional career at next Nanaimo Astronomy Society meeting

Cam Wipper, an astronomer with the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, will talk about how his career took him from Vancouver Island to the big island of Hawaii at Nanaimo Astronomy Society’s upcoming monthly meeting. (Photo submitted)
In this Sunday, Dec. 13, 2020 photo made available by NASA, Saturn, top, and Jupiter, below, are seen after sunset from Shenandoah National Park in Luray, Va. The two planets are drawing closer to each other in the sky as they head towards a “great conjunction” on Monday, Dec. 21, where the two giant planets will appear a tenth of a degree apart. (Bill Ingalls/NASA via AP)

Jupiter and Saturn align in our skies tonight, to form the Great Conjunction

Stargazers typically gather in groups at observatories or with backyard telescopes for such events

  • Dec 21, 2020
In this Sunday, Dec. 13, 2020 photo made available by NASA, Saturn, top, and Jupiter, below, are seen after sunset from Shenandoah National Park in Luray, Va. The two planets are drawing closer to each other in the sky as they head towards a “great conjunction” on Monday, Dec. 21, where the two giant planets will appear a tenth of a degree apart. (Bill Ingalls/NASA via AP)
Mars will appear orange and distinct in the night sky this month. (Damian Peach photo)

Mars jumps out from the night sky across B.C.

Mars is the brightest it’s been in 15 years this October

Mars will appear orange and distinct in the night sky this month. (Damian Peach photo)
The Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope on Mauna Kea. (Stock photo)

Hawaii telescope operator from Nanaimo will trace his path in astronomy

Cam Wipper to be featured Friday, Aug. 28, in Royal Astronomical Society of Canada webinar

The Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope on Mauna Kea. (Stock photo)
This image of Comet NEOWISE, taken near Pipers Lagoon Park by Tony Puerzer, Nanaimo Astronomy Society vice-president, illustrates the quality that can be achieved with basic photographic equipment. The image was shot with a 50 millimetre, f/1.4 lens on a Canon digital camera for an exposure time of six seconds, at a sensitivity setting of 1600 ISO, Puerzer’s recommended recipe for imaging the comet with minimal equipment. (Tony Puerzer photo)

Nanaimo Astronomy Society offers tips on how to capture Comet NEOWISE

Fancy equipment not needed to photograph comet on 6,800-year orbital journey, says society VP

This image of Comet NEOWISE, taken near Pipers Lagoon Park by Tony Puerzer, Nanaimo Astronomy Society vice-president, illustrates the quality that can be achieved with basic photographic equipment. The image was shot with a 50 millimetre, f/1.4 lens on a Canon digital camera for an exposure time of six seconds, at a sensitivity setting of 1600 ISO, Puerzer’s recommended recipe for imaging the comet with minimal equipment. (Tony Puerzer photo)
Alan McConnachie, Maunakea Spectroscopic Explorer project spokesperson, will discuss the capabilities of the new 11.25-metre aperture telescope and the scientific discoveries it could unveil, at the Nanaimo Astronomy’s next meeting Feb. 27. (Photo submitted)

Astrophysicist to explain how new telescope turns stars into rainbows

Guest speaker describes 11.25-metre aperture Maunakea Spectral Explorer program Feb. 27 in Nanaimo

Alan McConnachie, Maunakea Spectroscopic Explorer project spokesperson, will discuss the capabilities of the new 11.25-metre aperture telescope and the scientific discoveries it could unveil, at the Nanaimo Astronomy’s next meeting Feb. 27. (Photo submitted)