We need to stand up to bullies

Some think their rights are more important to the point of causing great discomfort and injustice to others.

To the Editor,

We read in some form of media about bullying at school and corporate bullying, but do we ever notice when we are being bullied in our own home, workplace, business or even volunteer group?

Likely not, because it’s a different kind of bullying: it’s prejudice. Some think their rights are more important to the point of causing great discomfort and injustice to others. We are all capable of abiding by the same peace-serving rules, except some individuals change the ones that don’t suit them because their way is the only way.

To others adversely affected by this narcissism, it becomes a point of contention and action – become a doormat, complain to a higher level or confront the individual. Some will do the former, but that does not stop the bullying; it actually validates and perpetuates the bully way of life, as do the bully supporters you complain to that tell you to ‘put up or shut up.’

I learned the hard way how unhealthy the doormat demeanour is when it comes to personal and spiritual freedoms and although complaining can label one a troublemaker and confrontation can be sickeningly uncomfortable, I take those freedoms very seriously.

Diane BabcockNanaimo