GUEST COMMENT: Investment needed in energy projects, not smart meters

For decades I have done research and volunteer work in the highest inhabitable regions of the world, the Peruvian Andes.

To the Editor,

For decades I have done research and volunteer work in the highest inhabitable regions of the world, the Peruvian Andes.

With an NGO of volunteers which I founded in Cusco in 1992, we do health campaigns and cooperate with the indigenous people on environmentally sustainable projects – solar light, solar hot water, reforestation, health clinics, and many more.

I am very concerned about the health of the people on this planet, especially the poorest and most vulnerable in developing countries.

It’s all the more shocking to return to beautiful B.C. to find out how vulnerable one can be in a so-called developed country, which calls itself a democracy, where I must now fight for my own health and that of my family and other British Columbians.

We live in a very polluted world to which B.C. Hydro/Corix adds smart meters that emit radio frequency microwave radiation and class 2-B carcinogens.

They don’t seem to know about the dangerous cumulative effect of radiation, the silent killer, that affects all people, especially those who are sensitive (35 per cent of the population) and hyper-sensitive (three per cent) to electro-magnetic radiation.

“The smart meter is here to stay”, is the answer people get from government and B.C. Hydro/Corix regardless of the problems it causes.

Whenever this phrase comes to mind, I shudder, thinking about the poor people in this world who must live under a dictatorship. Not a benevolent dictatorship, but a malevolent one that imposes unhealthy and dangerous products on its people.

To make the electro smog even thicker, our government plans to also install powerful routers for Wi-Fi in all urban areas of B.C.

How many people must get ill or die, how many children must become learning-disabled and hyper-sensitive before our ‘leaders’ realize what they have done to us and future generations?

I know that not all politicians agree with the smart meter, a very bad idea, which only a drunk driver could embrace.

Will smart meters be installed in kindergartens, schools and hospitals?  Or will there be separate institutions for people who are radiation-sensitive, just as other disabled people get help?

The longer we are exposed to radiation, the less radiation we will be able to tolerate.  Recently, an honest B.C. Hydro employee said to me: “if you think you have a problem now, just wait until the whole grid is activated by the end of 2012, then you’ll have a real problem on your hands.”

In California, smart meters are now being removed in some places because of serious health problems and many smart meter fires have also occurred. Will the B.C. Liberal government and corporate monopolists recognize their mistakes before it is too late?

Our planet is on the verge of being destroyed by humanity’s irresponsible actions.

Instead of using $1 billion on disease-causing smart meters, will British Columbians show wisdom and vision by using this money to work on alternative energy projects which promote health on this planet, give work to our people and restore the dignity and respect due to all life?

Inge Bolin

Nanaimo

 

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