Electoral reform is long overdue

Two truths become clear when you view the House of Commons’ Special Committee on Electoral Reform.

To the Editor,

Two truths become clear when you view the House of Commons’ Special Committee on Electoral Reform.

A government formed by some form of proportional system will more accurately reflect Canadian values across the board. Majority values will then form policies and programs, not majority governments.

The second obvious conclusion is that electoral reform with its many options are way too complicated for the average Canadian to understand to vote on in a referendum. We have 338 MPs to debate, digest and vote on all the various options.

Conservatives want a referendum on electoral reform as it is their only chance to defeat the coming changes and only under truth serum would Conservatives admit to the aforementioned truths.

It will pass because it is just.

R.G. BurnettNanaimo

 

To the Editor,

Re: Citizens consulted on electoral reform, Sept. 13.

I, like a lot of people I have talked to regarding how to vote, do not want changes in our voting system. I am fine the way things stand today on the way we vote. I have one vote and not a second and third choice. Even with a candidate I do not like and have to hold my nose to mark the X, I believe in the policies of one party only.

Bob EricksonNanaimo

 

To the Editor,

Re: Citizens consulted on electoral reform, Sept. 13.

One cannot argue that voting reform ensuring that all votes count in a democracy would be a good thing. Too bad we do not have a democracy. Thousands of people now realize what a grand fraud the so-called Western-style democracies have become. Our governments are corporations in which the people they proclaim to serve have been reduced to consumers and taxpayers, the taxpayer being the lowest entity in the corporate government hierarchy.

When the election is over, we have no more democratic voice than does any other non-management employee of any other large corporation.

Our rule of law best serves justice only to those who can afford to pay for it and it has become the heavy hammer by which those who control it impose their agendas upon the people while allowing them to proclaim that due process was followed.

Our independent watchdogs are stripped of their authority or stacked with sympathizers who steer decisions to pre-determined outcomes and again proclaim that due process was followed.

Tweak the electoral process all you want. It will change nothing until the basic rules of governance are changed to be more inclusive to the people.

James G. SmithNanaimo