Education model requires change

To prevent another job action at the end of whatever agreement is made this year, we must completely overhaul the delivery model.

BY RON DALE

The current situation between government and the B.C. Teachers’ Federation  has reached a severe impasse.

To prevent another job action at the end of whatever agreement is made this year, we must completely overhaul the delivery model. All players have an important role to play; all must want to improve our system. Here are my suggestions:

Government and school boards – Take back education policy from the BCTF; listen to the union when they bring forth realistic concerns regarding funding and positive initiatives. Look at ways of reducing downloaded costs to districts.  Develop in-district statistics on use and misuse of benefits. Streamline administration, commit to regular teacher evaluations, develop Pro D activities that pertain to hot-button issues such as class size and composition.

Take a strong position in terms of changing the delivery model.  Should not all schools have a special needs component? Inclusion is a wonderful and idealistic concept, but it puts too much stress on the expansion of the scope of learning abilities within each class.

Consider the year-round school model.  This would provide a better use of facilities, and most important, reduce loss of retention caused by a seven-week summer break. Study the utilization of school libraries now that technology is prevalent and research can be done using technology. Let’s catch up to the kids.

Demand that teacher-training institutions dedicate significant curricula time and research to special needs training.

Implementation of new programs in technology, trades, and construction. Reinstate the porfolio program: what better way for students to prepare themselves for a future?

Parents – Public schools are not a babysitting service, where teachers are often dealing with issues that should be developed at home. Prepare your child for elementary by having him or her recognize letters and numbers.  Teach and model sharing, social skills and how to behave in a social setting.

Monitor their progress and communicate regularly with teachers and the school.

Keep children active at home with physical and mental activities.

Teachers and educators –

Your 190-day contract is fairly compensated  and has a generous benefit packages. Asking more than what other public sector unions get is unrealistic.

Be prepared to work outside the clock and contract hours. Precious teacher student contact time happens outside the classroom. Preparation, marking and parent nights are a reality. They are an important part of your job.

Support ways of change that will allow new models of delivery that address problem areas in your school and school district.

Please consider the above because, if we continue to do things the ways we have already done them, public education in B.C. will continue to be dysfunctional.

Change is necessary.

Ron Dale is a director with the Nanaimo-Ladysmith Schools Foundation and a retired teacher, administrator and school trustee.

Just Posted

Nanaimo artist Melissa Anderson has paintings on display at White Rabbit Coffee Co. for the next month. (Josef Jacobson/News Bulletin)
Nanaimo painter showcases coastal Island views in first exhibit in two years

Melissa Anderson presents ‘Seascapes’ oil painting exhibit at White Rabbit Coffee Co.

New COVID-19 cases on Vancouver Island by local health area for the week of June 6-12. (B.C. Centre for Disease Control image)
New COVID-19 cases up on Island, but health officials say trends going right way

There were 22 new COVID-19 cases in Greater Victoria last week after just four the week before

Regional District of Nanaimo is looking to repair sewage pipe in the Hammond Bay Road area, which was corroded by gas. (Black Press file)
Corroded sewer pipe along Nanaimo’s Hammond Bay Road will cost $5.5 million to fix

Pipe replacement and reinforcement part of $6.9-million infrastructure project

Kimberly Bussiere and other laid-off employees of Casino Nanaimo have launched a class-action lawsuit against the Great Canadian Gaming Corporation. (Chris Bush/News Bulletin)
Laid-off Casino Nanaimo workers launch class-action lawsuit against corporation

Notice of civil claim filed on April 6 at Supreme Court of B.C. in Nanaimo

People line up to get their COVID-19 vaccine at a vaccination centre, Thursday, June 10, 2021 in Montreal. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz
Vaccines, low COVID case counts increase Father’s Day hope, but risk is still there

Expert says people will have to do their own risk calculus before popping in on Papa

Helen Austin performing with Trent Freeman at the 2018 Vancouver Island MusicFest. Austin is one of the many performers listed for the 2021 event.
Vancouver Island MusicFest goes virtual for 2021

Black Press to stream 25 hours of programming July 9-11

Greater father involvement in the home leads to improved childhood development and increased marital satisfaction, says expert. (Black Press Media file photo)
Vancouver Island researcher finds lack of father involvement a drag on gender equality

Working women still taking on most child and household duties in Canada: UVic professor

FILE – A science class at L.A. Matheson Secondary in Surrey, B.C. on March 12, 2021. (Lauren Collins/Surrey Now Leader)
Teachers’ union wants more COVID transmission data as B.C. prepares for back-to-school

BCTF says that details will be important as province works on plan for September

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry outlines B.C.’s COVID-19 restart plan, May 25, 2021, including larger gatherings and a possible easing of mandatory masks on July 1. (B.C. government photo)
B.C. records 120 new COVID-19 cases, second vaccines accelerating

Lower Pfizer deliveries for early July, Moderna shipments up

A Heffley Creek peacock caught not one - but two - lifts on a logging truck this month. (Photo submitted)
Heffley Creek-area peacock hops logging trucks in search of love

Peacock hitched two lifts in the past month

The Calgary skyline is seen on Friday, Sept. 15, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
2 deaths from COVID-19 Delta variant in Alberta, 1 patient was fully immunized

Kerry Williamson with Alberta Health Services says the patients likely acquired the virus in the hospital

The first suspension bridge is the tallest in Canada, with a second suspension bridge just below it. The two are connected by a trail that’s just over 1 km. (Claire Palmer photo)
PHOTOS: The highest suspension bridges in Canada just opened in B.C.

The Skybridge in Golden allows visitors to take in views standing at 130 and 80 metres

BC Green Party leader and Cowichan Valley MLA Sonia Furstenau introduced a petition to the provincial legislature on Thursday calling for the end of old-growth logging in the province. (File photo)
BC Green leader Furstenau introduces old-growth logging petition

Party calls for the end of old-growth logging as protests in Fairy Creek continue

Most Read