EDITORIAL: Report card change needed

Paper report cards could become a thing of the past and the teachers’ job action is showing us how.

Paper report cards could become a thing of the past and the teachers’ job action is showing us how.

While many people cling to the idea of children bringing home a piece of paper with grades and comments at the end of term, it might be time to take another look at this standardized approach.

For generations, the industrial-style education system has been fixated on producing graduates like widgets and report cards mirrored this model with an overly simplistic analysis of students’ strengths and weaknesses.

What educators now know – and B.C.’s new personalized learning agenda aims to address, at least in principle – is that students have different learning styles and require assessments that are measurable, flexible, adaptable and motivating. Students need a plan that more closely reflects their learning styles, interests and goals instead of a standardized set of outcomes and reports.

So far, the province has done a poor job in defining personalized learning and conveying exactly what and how it will change B.C.’s education system – and under the current model of labour relations in education, it’s hard to know how this will be achieved.

Still, the teachers’ contract dispute has shown there are many ways to assess and report on student learning. Liberated from many administrative duties, teachers are communicating with parents and students by e-mail and telephone, posting information online, sending home records of individual assignments and outlining specific problems that need to be addressed.

What’s more, parents are being encouraged to seek out information about their child’s learning.

There will always be a need for some standardized assessment and reporting, but a piece of paper was never a fully meaningful record of success.

– Black Press

Just Posted

Sound mixer stolen from Nanaimo nightclub

Nanaimo RCMP ask for tips about theft of sound mixer from Koncept Nightclub

Memorial for drug overdose victims on display at St. Paul’s Church in Nanaimo

Flags of Hope Overdose Awareness Display at Chapel Street church until Aug. 29

QB McGarvey steers V.I. Raiders to first win of 2019 season

Raiders blow out Kamloops Broncos in home opener in Nanaimo

Traffic back to normal after accident at Island Highway-Brechin Road in Nanaimo

Accident involved truck and taxi at turn lane leading to Departure Bay ferry terminal

United Way’s denim drive launches at Nanaimo’s Woodgrove Centre

United by Denim campaign runs from Aug. 17 until Sept. 2

QUIZ: How much do you remember about Woodstock?

Weekend music festival in Bethel, New York, was held 50 years ago

Beefs & Bouquets, Aug. 15

To submit a beef or a bouquet to the Nanaimo News Bulletin, e-mail bulletinboard@nanaimobulletin.com

‘It’s just the freedom:’ Paralyzed Broncos player pursuing life on the water

The former Humboldt Broncos goaltender, who started in the net when he was nine, was paralyzed last year

Canadians killed in Afghanistan honoured during emotional dedication ceremony

One-hundred-fifty-eight Canadian soldiers died during the mission

It’s snow joke: Up to 30 cm of snow expected to fall in northeastern B.C.

Alaska Highway, Fort Nelson to be hit with August snowstorm, according to Environment Canada

‘I’m just absolutely disgusted’: Husband furious after B.C. Mountie’s killer gets day parole

Kenneth Fenton was sentenced to prison after he fatally struck Const. Sarah Beckett’s cruiser

Sea-to-Sky Gondola in B.C. likely out of commission until 2020

Sea to Sky Gondola carries between 1,500 and 3,000 people every day during the summer season

Helicopter-riding dog Mr. Bentley now featured on cans of new B.C.-made beer

Partial proceeds from every pack go to Children’s Wish

PHOTOS: Weapons seized at Portland right-wing rally, counterprotests

Not all who gathered Saturday were with right-wing groups or antifa

Most Read