Editorial: Get informed, then cast vote

Come the civic election Nov. 15, the more voters the merrier, and if they’re informed voters, even better.

Come the civic election Nov. 15, the more voters the merrier, and if they’re informed voters, even better.

B.C.’s local election campaigns officially began two weeks ago and have been going on, unofficially, since long before that. The race reached a milepost this week with the first true all-candidates meeting, hosted by Progressive Nanaimo last night after press time.

Meetings like that one, and the media coverage – pick up the next issue of the News Bulletin – are one way for voters to get themselves informed about the array of choices. There will be other all-candidates meetings and forums in the next few weeks.

The simplest source of information, perhaps, is the fall harvest of election signs that has sprouted on countless street corners around the city. Names, faces, slogans and website URLs try to point voters in a desired direction.

Social media, too, has some role to play, as candidates or their campaign managers have the ability to spread the message they want in their own words.

The Greater Nanaimo Chamber of Commerce launched its own municipal election website this week, giving candidates a chance to present a business plan, so to speak, for the city.

The Bulletin’s election info is also accessible on our website, where readers can check out questionnaires filled out by men and women running for mayor, city council, school trustee or regional district director. We will examine the election issues more closely over the coming weeks, and we hope readers will let us know which issues they feel are most important via a letter to the editor or a quick Facebook message.

What we’re saying is that there’s a ton of information out there, and more to come. There’s no reason not to be an informed voter, and there’s every reason to become one.