Better option exists for Vancouver Island’s rail corridor

The only sustainable option for this corridor is an affordable, easy-to-maintain, paved, multi-use, non-motorized-vehicle trail.

To the Editor,

Re: Tentative agreement could see passenger rail return to Island, April 3.

Sure, a passenger train sounds like a great idea until you ask yourself and elected officials these key questions: Will it be affordable? Who would be utilizing train services? Will the schedule be convenient? Would the railway be utilized by freight trains as well as passenger to be feasible? Do you want coal trains to be running through your city or backyard?

The only sustainable option for this corridor in my opinion is an affordable, easy-to-maintain, paved, multi-use, non-motorized-vehicle trail running from Victoria to Courtenay and possibly beyond.Accessible from airports, B.C. Ferries, and all municipalities, this trail would put Vancouver Island on the eco-tourism map and invite the world to explore beautiful British Columbia and the Island in a unique way.

Megan Olsenvia e-mail

 

Restore rail service one step at a time

To the Editor,

Re: Tentative agreement could see passenger rail return to Island, April 3.

The railway could consider smaller steps to begin operations. Repair and operate it in sections to restart service.

For the passenger car, it should serve Duncan to Victoria for commuters. The turnaround then could take tourists as far as Chemainus, stay long enough for dinner theatre or a mural walk. It would return to pick up commuters and back to Duncan for the night. Nanaimo should focus on freight. Fix the tracks through town first, for propane cars, then eventually fix the track to Port Alberni for freight and possibly a tourist car to Cathedral Grove and back.

Neil SaundersNanaimo

 

Train foundation should be trusted

To the Editor,

Re: Tentative agreement could see passenger rail return to Island, April 3.

I have been amazed at the amount of publicity given to the possible return of Via Rail passenger service on Vancouver Island. A small handful of politicians have made this a personal vendetta to stop all progress, because they don’t agree with who is at the helm.

These politicians seem to refer to their ‘experts,’ yet who are these experts? Do they have the credentials to challenge the professionals as well as the B.C. Safety Authority, or are they merely disgruntled protesters? To me it seems like they are experts in delaying a process that is very important to Vancouver Island’s future.

It’s time we get on board the train. We need to stop listening to these so-called ‘experts,’ and leave it to the professionals.

Mo TimeNanaimo

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