Abusive men should question themselves

The question should rather be, why don’t men leave the relationship as soon as they realize, or are told, that they are being abusive?

To the Editor,

Re: Too many hurt in their homes, Editorial, Sept. 25.

In your editorial, you address a matter that affects us all in one way or another.

We clamour for safe streets, but fear going home because it’s too dangerous. Women are being abused, not just physically, but verbally and emotionally as well. We need to own that the majority of violence is directed toward women by their male partners. This needs to be stated clearly so that men can own their part in the abuse.

So, with that in mind, I would like to reword part of a sentence in the editorial that asks why women stay in abusive relationships and how they can leave. The question should rather be, why don’t men leave the relationship as soon as they realize, or are told, that they are being abusive?

What’s stopping this from being the question to ask the man when he hurts his partner? It then becomes his responsibility to seek help and support to learn how to be in a relationship without being abusive.

​Wally RothNanaimo