VIU students glad to graduate

Some Vancouver Island University graduates felt an extra bit of relief to be walking across the stage in cap and gown Tuesday.

Chantal Stephan

Some Vancouver Island University graduates felt an extra bit of relief to be walking across the stage in cap and gown Tuesday.

A month-long faculty strike at the university this spring had many students worried their graduation dates would be pushed back. The strike ended just in time to save the semester without having to push classes into May or cancel the semester altogether.

About 650 students from 14 bachelor’s and master’s programs attended the degree graduation convocation ceremonies on Monday and Tuesday.

Pietro Solda, a 24-year-old criminology student, started his masters last week at Royal Roads University. In April, he was worried he would have to put off the next step in his education for another year.

“It affected my marks,” he said. “I’m glad we’re finally here. It’s more real now. It’s more official.”

Candice Entius, an interior design student, said the strike was “nerve wracking”, but now she’s merely relieved and excited to start the next chapter of her life.

“It’s a lot of hard work done,” she said.

The labour dispute worked in the favour of Ron Gaucher, a jazz studies student.

Gaucher, 23, was late in applying for the post baccalaureate education program at VIU, but the strike postponed the schedule, so his application made it in in time for him to start in September.

Being out of class for a month caused some consternation for Kim Moes, a liberal studies and creative writing student.

But when school was back in session, the 40-year-old was so happy and relieved to be back, she attacked her courses with renewed vigour and finished on a high note.

Liberal Studies student Andrea Sheppard was worried the strike would affect her graduation date, but used the time to catch up on homework and figured it wouldn’t do any good to get anxious about something she didn’t have any control over.

Sheppard, 23, plans to take a year off before going back to do a master’s degree in journalism – she wants to be a news anchor.

“I feel a lot more ready to take on the world than I did four years ago,” she said.

Video of the three graduation ceremonies can be viewed at http://www.viu.ca/convocation/live.

Just Posted

City of Nanaimo planning to build new boathouse at Long Lake by 2023

$1.35-$2-million project would be used by local rowing, canoe and kayak clubs

Lantzville’s Pottie ‘walking away’ from derelict hotel in Port Alberni after one week

WorkSafe B.C. issues stop work order; owner says cost to continue too high

UPDATE: Scooter rider suffers life-threatening injuries in crash in Nanaimo

One person airlifted to hospital in Victoria after collision on Wall Street on Thursday

VIU students in Nanaimo have been busy creating haven for bees

Peace garden and program to protect pollinators providing new educational opportunities

Beefs & Bouquets, Oct. 17

To submit a beef or a bouquet to the Nanaimo News Bulletin, e-mail bulletinboard@nanaimobulletin.com

UPDATE: Scooter rider suffers life-threatening injuries in crash in Nanaimo

One person airlifted to hospital in Victoria after collision on Wall Street on Thursday

Sailings cancelled between Brentwood Bay and Mill Bay

Mechanical issues expected to be resolved by end of day

Kawhi Leonard, former Toronto Raptor, welcomed back to Vancouver at pre-season game

Fans go wild at pre-season game between L.A. Clippers and Dallas Mavericks at Rogers Arena

Greens and NDP go head to head on West Coast; Scheer takes fight to Bernier

Trudeau turns focus to key ridings outside Toronto after two days in Quebec

Canucks beat Stanley Cup champs 4-3 in a shootout

Leivo nets winner, Vancouver dumps St. Louis for fourth straight win

Campbell River homicide suspects arrested in Vancouver

Two men remain in custody, but have not been charged

‘The more you test, the more you find’: Beef recalls a sign of success, experts say

Despite appearances, experts say a recent rise in major recalls is not a sign of food supply problems

Scholars say religious vaccine objections can’t be traced to Biblical sources

Vaccinations are a requirement to attend class in Ontario and New Brunswick, while B.C. launched a demand this fall

ELECTION 2019: How would the major parties address Canada’s housing crisis?

Promises include speculation taxes, more affordable housing, and declaring housing a human right

Most Read