Two B.C. men found liable in staging crash in ICBC lawsuit

Judge finds two of 13 defendants liable in Surrey ICBC scam

A B.C. Supreme Court judge has found two men fraudulently staged a traffic crash in Surrey after ICBC launched a lawsuit against 13 defendants claiming they tried to defraud the corporation.

The two men are Basim Mansur and Yasir Khayyoo.

Justice Michael Brundrett dismissed ICBC’s case against the 11 other men and women, finding ICBC “painted its allegations of civil fraud with too broad of a brush.”

The Insurance Corporation of British Columbia took 13 people to court – Basim and Besma Mansur, Jenvian Dawood, Melad Putrus Hana, Sandra Azez, Johni Soko, Faris Al-Toos, Maykil Zaya, Nehad Nader, Tofen and Yasir Khayyoo, Aneez Jameel, and Ayman Jamil – in B.C. Supreme Court in Vancouver, alleging their involvement in fraudulent personal injury and property damage claims related to three Surrey traffic crashes.

The collisions were on May 29, 2010, Aug. 11, 2013 and Aug. 17, 2013.

“ICBC says that the three collisions amounted to substantial frauds on the insurance ratepayers of British Columbia,” Brundrett noted.

The first collision was at the intersection of 104th Avenue and 152nd Street in Guildford involving a Suzuki owned by Basim Mansur. His sister Besma Mansur was driving, with Jenvian Dawood – Basim and Besma Mansur’s mother – in the front passenger street.

The Suzuki was rear-ended by a Dodge Caravan owned by Jack Yako, with his brother Jan Yako in the front passenger seat. Neither of the Yakos were alleged to have committed fraud.

Brundrett dismissed ICBC’s claim against the defendants in this crash, stating, “I cannot find that Basim Mansur committed a civil fraud, or that Besma Mansur and Jenvian Dawood were complicit in a fraud committed by him.”

READ ALSO: ICBC not liable for intoxicated Surrey driver, judge confirms

READ ALSO: Court of appeal advances class action lawsuit in ICBC privacy violations case

Meanwhile, ICBC’s lawyers argued that the second and third crashes, in 2013, were staged as part of a fraudulent insurance claim. The second crash, at 101A Avenue and 148th Street in Guildford, happened at 1:45 a.m. and police arrived at the scene within two minutes.

“The nature of the collision was that a 2003 Audi A4 sedan, travelling west on a side-street, being 101A Avenue, and driven by either Johni Soko or Maykil Zaya, went through a stop sign and struck or T-boned a 2000 Nissan X-Terra SUV owned and driven by Melad Hana,” the judge noted. “Mr. Hana’s Nissan was northbound on 148th Street when it was hit.”

Brundrett found no direct evidence that this crash had been staged. He dismissed ICBC’s case alleging civil fraud in this crash as well, finding that “on the whole of the evidence I cannot find that ICBC has proven that the collision was staged, or that the defendants either knew or were wilfully blind to the fact that they were going to be involved in a staged collision before it occurred.”

The third crash – on Aug. 17, 2013 – happened at the intersection of 144th Street and 84th Avenue in Newton, and involved a blue 2000 Porsche 911 Carrera convertible owned by Basim Mansur being hit from behind by a green 2006 Chevrolet Uplander van owned by Yasir Khayyoo.

The court heard Mansur was the lone person in the Porsche and Khayyoo driving the Chevrolet, with Aneez Jameel as his front passenger and his brother Ayman Jamil – they spell their surname differently – as his right rear passenger.

Basim Mansur and Yasir Khayyoo both made personal injury claims related to this crash, with ICBC paying out a total $34,007.72. Aneez Jameel and Ayman Jamil had also filed personal injury claims but subsequently withdrew them.

Brundrett noted that ICBC argued at court that this collision “was the product of an agreement amongst the occupants of both vehicles to stage a motor vehicle accident for the purpose of making a fraudulent insurance claim.” He found that Mansur had staged this third crash “with the aid of Mr. Khayyoo” but decided on a balance of probabilities that ICBC’s claim of civil fraud had not been made out against Aneez Jameel or Ayman Jamil.

The judge in his Dec. 31 reasons for judgment awarded ICBC general and specific damages against Mansur and Khayyoo to the tune of $34,007.72, as suggested by ICBC, and $10,000 in punitive damages against Mansur.

“Mr. Mansur was the initiator of the plot to stage the collision, and he covered up his conduct repeatedly,” Brundrett found. “He organized a deliberate scheme to defraud the publicly-owned plaintiff.”

As for Khayyoo, the judge said, his “conduct in deliberately participating in a scheme to defraud ICBC is reprehensible and deserving of rebuke. However, Mr. Khayyoo was not the operating mind behind the fraud.”

Brundrett noted Khayyoo had only recently arrived in Canada, “badly needed money, and was vulnerable to being improperly influenced by Mr. Mansur.

“Importantly, after initially giving a false statement, Mr. Khayyoo came forward on his own initiative and admitted to his role in the affair. He was contrite, apologetic and cooperated with ICBC. He later testified in what I find was a forthright manner at trial.”

Brundrett said Khayyoo’s evidence was critical in proving the third collision had been staged and “endured intimidation for doing so.

“Normally, someone in his situation might expect a significant award for punitive damages against them,” Brundrett said. “However, in these exceptional circumstances, I would decline to make an award of punitive damages against Mr. Khayyoo.”

Paul Evans, the lawyer who represented Besma Mansur and Jenvian Dawood, told the Now-Leader his clients are on one hand pleased the judge accepted their evidence. “They’ve maintained all the time that they were honest and forthright in their dealings with ICBC, and the judgment obviously confirms that.”

“On the other hand,” Evans added, “it’s still a lingering element of frustration that it’s taken the better part of a decade for the legal proceedings to get to where they are now.

“They’re still not entirely over, as there’s going to be the question of costs and of course they’ve gone to tremendous personal and legal cost getting to where they are today,” he said. “They are both of very modest means, fighting a corporation with potentially limitless resources.”



tom.zytaruk@surreynowleader.com

Like us on Facebook Follow us on Instagram and follow Tom on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

B.C. Liberal leader Andrew Wilkinson announces new infrastructure spending on the Lower Mainland on Monday, flanked by Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows candidate Cheryl Ashlie and Maple Ridge-Mission candidate Chelsa Meadus. (Neil Corbett/Black Press)
Wilkinson says plan to rebuild B.C. will work for Vancouver Island

B.C. Liberal leader talks to the News Bulletin about homelessness, forestry, infrastructure

Nanaimo RCMP are asking for the public’s assistance in locating Michael Leighton, who is wanted on 11 warrants on Vancouver Island and is a suspect in a recent break, enter and theft in Nanaimo. (Photos submitted)
Nanaimo RCMP looking for break-and-enter suspect with 11 warrants

Police say Michael Leighton a suspect in theft of pistol and $40,000 worth of coins

Plastic checkout bags could be banned in Nanaimo by next summer if a city bylaw receives provincial approval. (News Bulletin file photo)
Nanaimo moves closer to banning plastic and other single-use checkout bags

Nanaimo city council votes to forward checkout bag regulation bylaw to province for approval

Rotary Centennial Garden at Maffeo Sutton Park. (Sean Fenzl photo)
New Rotary garden officially open at Nanaimo’s Maffeo Sutton Park

Rotary Centennial Garden design inspired by the shoreline

Jenna Forster moderated the Virtual All Candidates Forum between Duck Paterson (top left); Chris Istace (top right); and Doug Routley (Youtube/Ladysmith Chamber of Commerce)
Nanaimo-North Cowichan candidates state their case in virtual debate

Duck Paterson, Chris Istace, and Doug Routley are on the ballot for October 24

FILE – People wait in line at a COVID-19 testing facility in Burnaby, B.C., on Thursday, August 13, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
167 new COVID-19 cases, 1 death recorded as B.C. enters 2nd wave

Three new healthcare outbreaks also announced

This 2020 electron microscope image made available by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases shows a Novel Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 particle isolated from a patient, in a laboratory in Fort Detrick, Md. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-NIAID/NIH via AP
At least 49 cases of COVID-19 linked to wedding in Calgary: Alberta Health

McMillan says the city of Calgary has recently seen several outbreaks linked to social gatherings

UBC geoscientists discovered the wreckage of a decades-old crash during an expedition on a mountain near Harrison Lake. (Submitted photo)
Wreckage of decades-old plane crash discovered on mountain near Harrison Lake

A team of Sts’ailes Community School students helped discover the twisted metal embedded in a glacier

Candidates in the Nanaimo riding include Kathleen Jones, B.C. Liberal Party, top left; Sheila Malcolmson, NDP; Lia Versaevel, Green Party. (Photos submitted/News Bulletin photo/Elections B.C. image)
B.C. VOTES 2020: Nanaimo candidates

Provincial election candidates discuss their priorities in their own words

Candidates in the Nanaimo-North Cowichan riding include Chris Istace, B.C. Green Party, top left; Duck Paterson, B.C. Liberals; and Doug Routley, NDP. (Photos submitted/Elections B.C. image)
B.C. VOTES 2020: Nanaimo-North Cowichan candidates

Provincial election candidates discuss their priorities in their own words

Candidates in the Parksville-Qualicum riding include Rob Lyon, B.C. Green Party, top left; Don Purdey, Conservatives; John St. John, independent; Michelle Stilwell, B.C. Liberals; and Adam Walker, B.C. NDP. (Photos submitted/Elections B.C. image)
B.C. VOTES 2020: Parksville-Qualicum candidates

Provincial election candidates discuss their priorities in their own words

The official search to locate Jordan Naterer was suspended Saturday Oct. 17. Photo courtesy of VPD.
‘I am not leaving without my son,’ says mother of missing Manning Park hiker

Family and friends continue to search for Jordan Naterer, after official efforts suspended

A bear similar to this black bear is believed responsible for killing a llama in Saanich on Oct. 19. (Black Press Media file photo)
Bear kills llama on Vancouver Island, prompting concerns over livestock

Officers could not track the bear they feel may not fear humans

Bernard Trest and his son Max, 10, are concerned about B.C.’s plan for students in the classroom. He was one of two fathers who filed a court application in August to prevent schools from reopening if stricter COVID-19 protections weren’t in place. That application was dismissed last week. (Contributed photo)
B.C. dad pledges to appeal quashed call for mandatory masks, distancing in schools

Bernard Trest and Gary Shuster challenged health, education ministries’ return-to-school plan

Most Read