In 2019, the average Canadian family of two or more people will pay $52,675 in total taxes. (Black Press Media files)

Tax Freedom Day: Today British Columbians start working for themselves

Average Canadian family of two or more will pay $52,675 in total taxes, or 44 per cent of income

This Friday is offering a bit more of a boost than just being the end of the week: it marks the first day of the year where your income is entirely your own.

READ MORE: Tax hikes across B.C. set for 2019

According to Fraser Institute’s calculations, June 14 is this year’s federal Tax Freedom Day. The exact day is determined each year based on the annual tax burden for Canadian families by federal and provincial governments compared to the average income.

In 2019, the average Canadian family of two or more people will pay $52,675 in total taxes. That’s 44 per cent of their annual income of $117,731 going to income taxes, carbon taxes, property taxes and more.

“If Canadians paid all their taxes up front, they would work the first 164 days of this year before bringing any money home to their families,” Finn Poschmann, resident scholar at the Fraser Institute, said in a news release.

In B.C., the provincial Tax Freedom Day was Monday.


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

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