(Tom Fletcher/Black Press)

Speaker of B.C. legislature threatens to resign, calls situation a ‘circus’

Darryl Plecas says he’ll resign if financial audits being done don’t result in outrage from the public and taxpayers.

The Speaker of British Columbia’s legislature says he’ll resign if financial audits being done don’t result in outrage from the public and taxpayers.

Darryl Plecas made his statements during an all-party committee meeting that is grappling with the fallout of a police investigation that saw the legislature’s top two officials placed on administrative leave.

READ MORE: B.C. legislature clerk, sergeant at arms suspended for criminal investiagtion

Plecas told members of the committee that he can’t discuss the reasons behind the investigation but welcomes an audit of the books “because they need to be examined.”

Sergeant-at-arms Gary Lenz and house clerk Craig James were escorted from the building last month after the members of the legislature voted unanimously to place them on administrative leave because of the RCMP investigation.

READ MORE: Timeline of events in RCMP investiagtion at B.C. legislature

Lenz and James have denied any wrongdoing and their lawyer has demanded they be allowed to return to their jobs while the investigation continues.

Plecas says soon after he was appointed Speaker last year he was made aware of issues that warranted him to do his due diligence on behalf of taxpayers.

The lawyer for Lenz and James couldn’t immediately reached for comment.

READ MORE: Opposition pushes for emergency meeting amid B.C. legislature turmoil

Two special prosecutors were appointed on Oct. 1, but the RCMP has not commented beyond stating the investigation involves “the activities of senior staff at the British Columbia legislature.”

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