School employers’ association reviewing Nanaimo district’s administrator compensation

NANAIMO - Nanaimo school district administrators will have their wages and compensation reviewed.

The B.C. Public School Employers’ Association is in the process of conducting a review that could lead to wage increases for school administrators in Nanaimo.

The B.C. government froze management compensation in September 2012 and the association, which acts as the bargaining agent for B.C.’s public school boards, plans on conducting the Sectoral Exempt Staff Compensation Review Project examining wages and benefits for principals, vice-principals and management staff.

According to information provided by the association, the government recently announced interim relief as it moves to transition out of the compensation freeze, so it was timely for the association to help boards in a market review. A substantive review hasn’t taken place since 2009.

The review will be completed in conjunction with school districts and will look at all elements of compensation packages: annual salaries, health and welfare benefits, vacation and other paid time off. The process will take several months and is estimated to be completed by early in 2016, according to the association.

Graham Roberts, Nanaimo school district secretary-treasurer, said it isn’t a general wage increase and will be done by individual job.

“It may be some districts that don’t get anything, there may be some districts that get small amounts, there maybe some that get [increases]. What our financial impact is, we will not know for a while yet,” said Roberts.

He said elementary principals in the district earn between $97,000 to $104,000, depending on school size, while vice-principals earn about $90,000. Secondary school principals earn between $112,000 to $123,000, while vice-principals $100,000.

Steve Rae, Nanaimo school board chairman, said whether administrators will get a raise has not yet been determined.

“They need to be treated fairly and whether or not that is a raise, it’s not for me to say yet. It’s way too early in the game to say that, but if in fact, somebody hasn’t had a raise since 2010, I think they deserve to be brought up to current levels.”

The findings will be part of a submission to the provincial government, after Nanaimo and other boards of education have reviewed and approved it.

Western Compensation and Benefits Consultants will assist the association with the review.

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