A group of protesters have block a ship carrying pipe for the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion from docking in the Port of Vancouver, WA, on Nov.5, 2019.(Portland Rising Tide/Facebook)

Protesters lock themselves to Washington port to block Trans Mountain pipeline shipment

Five demonstraters, supported by kayakers, have stopped the ship from docking

A handful of protesters locked themselves to a dock at the Port of Vancouver in Washington State on Tuesday morning in a bid to stop a shipment meant for the Trans Mountain pipeline from getting to B.C.

According to the Portland Rising Tide, five protesters from Oregon and Washington climbed onto the dock with the help of dozens of kayakers and other boats, and prevented an incoming cargo ship, believed to be carrying materials for the Trans Mountain expansion, from docking for several hours.

Video posted by the activists at about 10:30 a.m. showed local police officers attempting to detain those on the dock.

“This is not just a Canadian problem, but an American problem, too,” Cedar George-Parker, a member of the Tsleil-Waututh Nation on Burrard Inlet, said in a news release. “We need people in the U.S. to stand in solidarity and take action to stop this pipeline. The border will not divide us.”

This is the third protest targeting the port in recent months, after activists learned that pipe materials were being shipped to Washington, then transported by rail to B.C.

READ MORE: Saskatchewan granted intervener status in First Nations TMX project appeal

The expansion of the controversial project was approved for a second time in June, after the Federal Court of Appeal tore up the original approval last year due to insufficient environmental review and inadequate Indigenous consultations.


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Nanaimo school district starting from scratch on testing water for lead

Health Canada changed acceptable levels to 0.005 mg/L in March, prompting re-testing at schools

Nanaimo service station first in B.C. to be part of Petro-Canada’s ‘electric highway’

EV charge stations started operating last month at service station at Terminal and Princess Royal

New VIU president sworn in at ceremony at Snuneymuxw Longhouse

Deborah Saucier says VIU is committed to inclusion and reconciliation with indigenous peoples

Nanaimo Clippers win on Matt Irwin night

NHL defenceman first player added to BCHL club’s wall of honour

Yellow Point Ecological Society advocating for protection of private forests

The group is concerned about the loss of forests in the Yellow Point area

Listening to Christmas music too early could affect your mental health

Linda Blair, a clinical psychologist, says preemptive Christmas music can trigger anxiety

Port Alberni mom takes school district to court over Indigenous smudging, prayer in class

Candice Servatius, who is an evangelical Christian, is suing School District 70

Man, 50, dies following incident in downtown Parksville

Teenage girl hailed as hero for intervening after witnessing situation unfold

Senior dies after suffering medical emergency and crashing vehicle in Nanoose Bay

Bystanders performed CPR while waiting for first responders

Nanaimo artist Willow Friday presents first photo exhibition at Artzi Stuff

‘Wanderlust’ chronicles Friday’s recent trip through the American southwest

Family of B.C. man killed in hit-and-run plead for tips, one year later

Cameron Kerr’s family says the driver and passengers tried to cover their tracks

Princeton couple pays for dream vacation with 840,000 grocery store points

It’s easy if you know what you are doing, they say

Chilliwack family’s dog missing after using online pet-sitting service

Frankie the pit bull bolted and hit by a car shortly after drop off through Rover.com

B.C. wildlife experts urge hunters to switch ammo to stop lead poisoning in birds

OWL, in Delta, is currently treating two eagles for lead poisoning

Most Read