Ontario man charged with selling Canadian’s usernames and passwords

Ontario man ran site that peddled billions of pieces of personal data: RCMP

An Ontario man faces several criminal charges for allegedly peddling information from an online database containing 1.5 billion usernames and passwords.

The arrest announced Monday by the RCMP provides a glimpse into the murky layers of the so-called dark web — the shadowy, underground corners of the internet — and highlights the perils of staying secure in cyberspace.

The Mounties accuse Jordan Evan Bloom of Thornhill, Ont., of selling stolen personal identities through the website Leakedsource.com, which held a total of some three billion pieces of sensitive data.

Bloom, 27, is charged with offences including trafficking in identity information, unauthorized use of a computer, mischief with data and possession of property obtained by crime.

Bloom allegedly assembled the extensive database through the dark web, where he obtained personal information stolen by hackers in recent years from domains like networking site LinkedIn and extramarital affair hub ashleymadison.com, RCMP Staff Sgt. Maurizio Rosa told a news conference Monday.

Bloom is alleged to have earned about $247,000 by selling data.

“Jordan Bloom essentially acted as a middleman between the dark web and the internet that most of us use every day,” Rosa said.

The police operation began in 2016 when the RCMP learned that Leakedsource.com was being hosted by servers located in Quebec. The site has since been shut down.

Rosa said it is safe to say that several Canadians were affected — he could not provide a precise number — and may still be at risk due to the information being available on line through various dark web sites.

Canadians should know that when they reuse passwords across different websites and for internet-based services, the password — if stolen — could be compromised on an ongoing basis, he said.

He urged people to follow safe cyberpractices discussed on the RCMP website and to report online security violations to the police. “We know that these crimes are underreported and we know that we do not have all the answers to be able to combat these crimes.”

Rosa thanked the Dutch National Police and the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation for help on the case.

“Most cybercrimes don’t recognize borders, and this case was no different.”

Jim Bronskill, The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Nanaimo plays hockey in support of Humboldt

Humboldt Strong Street Hockey Tournament held Sunday, April 22 at Nanaimo North Town Centre

RCMP looking for missing Nanaimo man

Mathias Millette has been missing since April 22

MLA Stilwell chairing B.C. Liberals’ new affordability committee

Opposition thinking about election readiness

B.C. Lions star helps Nanaimo players hone their game

Emmanuel Arceneaux was guest coach at the Jay Prepchuk football camp Sunday at John Barsby Secondary

Nanaimo projects cited for excellence in building awards

Several projects score with judges in 2017 VIREB Commercial Building Awards.

REPLAY: B.C. this week in video

In case you missed it, here’s a look at replay-worthy highlights from across the province this week

As Osoyoos Indian Band flourishes, so too does Okanagan’s wine tourism

Indigenous practices have driven growth of South Okanagan’s wine history and agricultural influence

Renewed plea for answers in 40-year-old B.C. cold case

The family of Lawrence Wellington Allard is hoping a private reward will get them some closure

UPDATED: Arrest made after van hits pedestrians in Toronto

Police are not saying what is the extent of injuries yet

B.C. farmland values grew at slower rate in 2017: report

Vancouver Island saw the highest growth in the province

Turbulent times for outgoing B.C. Lieutenant Governor

Judith Guichon ends term today, returns to Nicola Valley ranch

NHL playoffs weekly roundup

Maple Leafs look to stay alive tonight as they face elimination against Boston on home ice

Electric vehicles more affordable than you think: BC Hydro

Myths blocking road to electric vehicle adoption

Kinder Morgan bungled pipeline public relations: poll

The survey suggests 58 per cent of Canadians believe the company is to blame for poor perceptions

Most Read