B.C. Green Party leader Andrew Weaver.

No plan to change B.C. Green party name over federal rift on Israel: Weaver

B.C. leader says federal Green party 'hijacked' by activists pushing sanctions

B.C. Green Party leader Andrew Weaver is further distancing himself from infighting at the federal Green Party over its adoption of a policy pushing for sanctions against Israel, but he rules out any name change for the provincial party, at least in the short term.

Weaver said he found it “bizarre” that he was publicly criticized in an open letter by 24 federal Green members, including three members of the party’s shadow cabinet who have since been fired by federal Green leader Elizabeth May.

“It looked to me like a group of individuals went rogue,” Weaver said in an interview, adding he supported May’s decision. “It is not relevant to British Columbia politics.”

The signatories of the letter called Weaver “misguided” for refusing to support the so-called BDS policy endorsing boycott, divestment and sanctions against Israel that was passed at the federal Green convention over the summer.

Weaver said the federal party has been “hijacked” by a narrow interest group pushing the BDS policy.

May herself had threatened to quit the federal party over the issue but later relented.

A serious political party should not simply adopt the policies of an external activist group, Weaver said, adding the NDP is now on a similar path after voting to debate the activist-pushed Leap Manifesto for high-speed reform on environmental and social justice issues.

“As soon as a political party rallies behind the agenda of an outside entity it loses relevance,” Weaver said. “This is activism, it’s not politics. Politics requires a much more thoughtful approach to policy debate, not the kind ‘You’re with us or you’re against us’ type of mentality which was displayed here.”

Weaver said the federal Liberals, New Democrats and Conservatives all rejected the BDS movement, but said proponents then turned to the Greens as a vessel to advance it.

The policy passed in a contentious vote at the federal convention where May was cut off from speaking. She aims to reverse it at a special meeting in December.

Weaver suggested many backers of the policy legitimately want peace in the Middle East, but don’t comprehend the ramifications.

“When BDS essentially assigns the blame – all blame – to one side of this very complex issue, that’s not how you’re going to move forward, that’s not helpful for the international discourse.”

He emphasized the B.C. Green Party is not a provincial wing of the federal Green Party of Canada, unlike the federal and provincial NDP.

“I’ve got a lot of federal Liberals on my team who are members of the federal Liberal party but also members of the B.C. Green Party,” Weaver said, adding that’s not usually permitted when federal and provincial parties are linked.

As for changing the name of the B.C. Green Party to make the distinction clearer, he said that couldn’t happen before the next election and a future convention, and it isn’t an option he is championing.

“I’m not suggesting that we have a name change,” Weaver said. “I’m not going to lead that. I’m not going to fight it. I am going to listen to it.”

He said concerns about the Green name he has heard in the past have usually been that it doesn’t play well in resource-oriented regions such as the Peace River country.

“We’ve had a lot of people say ‘We love what you do as a party, but we have concerns about your name.’ So at some point maybe somebody is going to raise that at the next convention. Certainly nothing will happen before the next election.”

Weaver said he remains focused on positioning the B.C. Greens as a valid centrist option between the “extreme politics” of the NDP and BC Liberals.

Just Posted

Dogs, dogs and more dogs in Nanoose this weekend

Nanaimo Kennel Club hosts annual show

Vancouver Island Chamber Music Festival comes to Nanaimo

Performances to take place over two days at St. Paul’s Anglican Church

Nanaimo dancer to join ‘renowned’ European ballet company

Nico Janssen to teach classes at Vibe Studios before joining Royal Danish Ballet

New Nanaimo fire hall plans unveiled

Nanaimo Fire Rescue hopes new station will be operational by 2022

Students at central Nanaimo school kept indoors due to bear sighting

B.C. Conservation en route to Coal Tyee school, says Nanaimo school district

VIDEO: First Nations, developer call for return and protection of sacred B.C. burial site

Dozens of First Nations leaders gather on grassy plateau to call on action by provincial government

Suspect arrested following gunpoint robbery in Qualicum Beach

Stop and Shop Grocery was robbed June 5; man now in custody

Cyclists competing in one of the toughest bike races on the planet pass through Fernie

Divide riders looking strong as they finish first leg of 4160 km race

You might not know these B.C. records are public

Hired a lawyer to file a civil claim? Those are published online

Teen stabbed after end-of-night limo dispute in downtown Vancouver

A young man, 19, is in serious condition following a dispute between two groups

B.C. bus driver loses case to get job back after texting while driving full bus

An arbitator ruled that Tim Wesman’s phone usage was a “a reckless disregard for public safety”

Peer at Jupiter this weekend with Nanaimo Astronomy Society

Viewing of Jupiter and moons scheduled for Maffeo Sutton Park on Saturday night

Revamped B.C. Lions set to battle veteran Winnipeg Blue Bombers

The Lions’ first test of the season will be a big one

No business case for Trans Mountain expansion, says former environment minister

Cabinet is expected to announce its decision on the expansion of the Alberta-to-B.C. pipeline by Tuesday

Most Read