No more mandatory counselling for man convicted of perjury in Air India bombing

But other parole conditions still apply

Former Duncan resident and convicted airplane bomber Inderjit Singh Reyat isn’t required to participate in counselling anymore.

The Parole Board of Canada made the decision earlier this month, but gave no explanation for it.

The counselling was meant to address “violence, empathy and cognitive distortions”, according to court documents.

Reyat still has to abide by the other conditions of his release.

They include that he not participate in any political activities for any organization, not contact any members of the victims’ families, not associate with criminals, not possess extremist propaganda and not possess any components that could be used to build an explosive devise.

Reyat, who worked in Duncan, on Vancouver Island, as a mechanic, was the only person convicted in the 1985 Air India bombings that killed 331 people.

RELATED STORY: REYAT’S RISK OF VIOLENCE TROUBLING

During his trial, it was revealed that he bought the dynamite, the detonators and the batteries for the attacks on two airliners while he was living in Duncan.

Reyat was a member of an extremist group fighting for a Sikh homeland at the time.

He received a seven-year sentence after being convicted of perjury in 2010 for repeatedly lying during his testimony at trial.

The parole board has indicated that resulted in his co-accused not being convicted in Canada’s worst mass murder.

In January, 2016, Reyat was given statutory release after serving two-thirds of his sentence, but still had the conditions that he must abide by.

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