Nanaimo City Hall. NEWS BULLETIN file photo

Nanaimo mayor and council salaries going up

Pay increase intended to offset loss of tax exemption

Nanaimo’s mayor and councillors will be getting pay raises that will cover higher income taxes.

City council, at its meeting Monday at the Vancouver Island Conference Centre, voted 8-1 in favour of a pay increase.

According to a staff report, the federal government is eliminating a “one-third deemed tax exemption” which would have meant a reduction in take-home pay for members of city council in 2019.

Council decided to bump up the mayor’s salary from $95,103 to $110,588, and councillor salaries from $36,636 to $42,692. Factoring in the elimination of the tax exemption, the mayor’s take-home pay remains exactly the same at $81,248 and councillors’ take-home pay increases about $1,300 from $33,686 to $34,975.

“What is being asked for tonight is simply to ensure that those members of council … will see exactly the same paycheque next month as the previous council did for the last four years. So there is no increase to anyone,” said Mayor Leonard Krog.

He said political representation “is important work in our community and we need to value our democracy.”

Coun. Erin Hemmens said “fair remuneration” helps to encourage people who have young families or are in single-income households, for example, to feel like they’re able to pursue public office.

“I recognize that it’s uncomfortable because we do have a big tax hike on the books, but for me, it’s a statement about making this a realistic goal to sit at this table for anyone who wants it,” she said.

The only dissenting vote was from Coun. Jim Turley, who pointed to the 5.1-per cent property tax increase in the preliminary budget and suggested the pay increase could be delayed a year.

“We’re asking our citizens to tighten their belts a little bit and I’m quite prepared to tighten mine to show respect for that,” he said.

District of Lantzville councillors voted themselves a pay increase earlier this month and the Nanaimo Ladysmith Public Schools trustees discussed a pay raise but delayed a decision until the new year.



editor@nanaimobulletin.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Nanaimo doctors asking for donations of masks and gloves during COVID-19 fight

Nanaimo Division of Family Practice co-ordinating efforts to collect supplies

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: COVID-19 symptoms must be taken seriously

Plausible pandemic scenarios could prove catastrophic for community, says letter writer

Nanaimo MLA part of historic near-empty legislative sitting that passed COVID-19 measures

A dozen MLAs alter Employment Standards Act, approve $5-billion spending package

B.C. Ferries passengers staying away, as asked, during COVID-19 pandemic

Ferry corporation says ridership down 70-80 per cent over the last week and a half

Food program available for Nanaimo youths during COVID-19 pandemic

Nanaimo Youth Services Association offering food initiative on Thursdays

B.C. is seeing the highest rate of COVID-19 recovery in Canada, and there’s a few reasons why

British Columbia was one of the first to see rise in COVID-19 cases, and has also switched up testing

Nanaimo couple caught aboard cruise ship with four dead and COVID-19 present

Four ‘older guests’ have died on Holland America’s Zaandam, cruise line confirms two COVID-19 cases

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Nanaimo hospital staff say lives depend on stopping spread of COVID-19

President of medical staff association, chief of staff at NRGH asking for community’s best efforts

RCMP, prime minister warn of text scam related to COVID-19 relief

Text message alerts about $,1375.50 deposits should be ignored or deleted, Nanaimo RCMP say

Home-schooling about to become the rule, not the exception, in Nanaimo-Ladysmith

Suspension of in-class instruction to take effect in Nanaimo-Ladysmith school district March 30

Experts weigh in on best handling of groceries during COVID-19 pandemic

Study suggests the virus can live for up to 24 hours on cardboard and up to three days on plastic

Sewers stitch masks to free up supplies for front-line health-care workers

“We have little old ladies sewing up a storm,” said Joan Davis

COVID-19 world update: Enforceable quarantine in NYC?; France orders 1 billion masks

Spain warns EU’s future at stake; New York governor calls Trump’s idea ‘federal declaration of war

Most Read