Nanaimo city manager tops annual pay report

NANAIMO – The City of Nanaimo has released its annual Statement of Financial Information.

What do a Ferrari and Nanaimo’s city manager have in common?

Their price tag.

City manager Ted Swabey made more than $231,356 in his first full year as top bureaucrat – nearly the equivalent of a 2015 Ferrari.

While still below the pay of former city manager Al Kenning, the salary makes Swabey the municipality’s highest earner of 2014.

Nanaimo has released its Statement of Financial Information, detailing the earnings and expenses of 232 of the highest-paid employees.

Nineteen new names moved onto the roster this year of employees with remuneration beyond $75,000. The bracket has been swelling every year since 2008, from 112 to 176 by 2011 and 213 in 2013.

Thirty-eight per cent of the list is dominated by fire department employees, but the upper echelons of salary-makers are department heads.

Swabey made about 20 per cent more than the second-highest earner in his first full year after taking over from Kenning in September 2013.

While statements of financial information haven’t yet been released by other similar-sized cities, documents from 2013 show the pay isn’t all that uncommon.

Kenning made $237,767 in 2013, while Kamloops CAO David Trawin pulled in $240,608 and Ron Mattiussi, Kelowna city manager, made $258,728.

Tom Hickey, general manager of community services, had the highest remuneration next to Swabey with $190,289, followed by Toby Seward, director of social and protective services, at $161,050.

Kenning lingered on the payroll with $155,521 last year, thanks to payouts for sick time and 8.8 months of banked vacation. Terry Hartley, the now-resigned director of human resources and organizational planning, rounded out the top five with $154,791.

Sasha Angus, CEO of the Nanaimo Economic Development Corporation, was in the ninth spot for highest earners with $139,374.

The highest expenses came from Diane Hiscock, manager of revenue services, at $14,761 – 83 per cent of which covered moving expenses when she was hired by the City of Nanaimo. Lesley Anderson, NEDC’s executive director of destination management, spent $14,180, including $1,033 on a meeting with Phil Nuytten with Nuytco Research Ltd. and Pacific Northwest Flower show, and a $1,291 workshop.

The full report is available at www.nanaimo.ca.

 

Just Posted

Neighbours petitioning against supportive housing on Terminal Avenue

B.C. Housing advises residents it’s considering site as a long-term location in Nanaimo

Coast Salish art unveiled at Regional District of Nanaimo headquarters

Following 2017 RFP process, RDN purchases First Nations art for board chambers and lobby

Nanaimo pot shops taking different approaches to legalization day

Day 1 of marijuana legalization sees unlicensed pot shops close, stay open

Motorcyclist collides with bear in Coombs

The man was transported to hospital

Nanaimo high school students cast their votes in mock municipal election

Dover Bay Secondary School students’ mock election ballot results posted

Mellow opening to B.C.’s only legal pot shop

About five people lined up early for the opening of the BC Cannabis Store in Kamloops.

Candidate lists finalized for Nanaimo, Lantzville, RDN, school district

Nomination deadline passes in advance of Oct. 20 local government elections

Election 2018: candidate questionnaires

News Bulletin’s questionnaire responses for Nanaimo, Lantzville, school board, regional district

Candidates make their case to be part of Nanaimo’s next council

Select candidates’ debates held Monday at the Vancouver Island Conference Centre

Nanaimo gets ready to rumble with Great B.C. Shake Out

Prepare for disaster drill by checking survival supplies and planning for real seismic event

Jagmeet Singh says marijuana pardons are not enough

Trudeau government will streamline pardon process for Canadians convicted of simple possession of marijuana in the past

Caregivers banned from smoking, growing cannabis around children-in-care: MCFD

Ministry has limited cannabis use for caregivers, stating it may “pose a risk to children and youth.”

Cheaper strains sell out within minutes on online BC Cannabis Store

Province says new strains will become available in the coming months

Most Read