Meng Wanzhou, chief financial officer of Huawei, arrives at B.C. Supreme Court to attend a hearing, in Vancouver, B.C., Friday, Nov. 27, 2020. The legal fight against extradition to the United States for Meng Wanzhou is back on in a Vancouver court amid a report that the American Justice Department is discussing a deal in the case. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Meng Wanzhou, chief financial officer of Huawei, arrives at B.C. Supreme Court to attend a hearing, in Vancouver, B.C., Friday, Nov. 27, 2020. The legal fight against extradition to the United States for Meng Wanzhou is back on in a Vancouver court amid a report that the American Justice Department is discussing a deal in the case. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Mountie says he updated FBI on Meng arrest, but he was working for the RCMP

Meng’s lawyers are seeking evidence through the hearings to support an abuse of process claim

An RCMP officer who was tasked as a point person for U.S. investigators during the 2018 arrest of Meng Wanzhou at Vancouver’s airport says he didn’t see himself as working for them.

Sgt. Ross Lundie told the B.C. Supreme Court on Monday that he updated the Federal Bureau of Investigation when the Huawei executive was arrested but he didn’t see anything wrong with that.

“At the end of the day, I’m not there to provide information or act on behalf of the FBI,” Lundie said. “I’m there working as an RCMP member.”

Meng returned to court Monday for the evidentiary hearing in her extradition case after a media report last week said the U.S. Justice Department is discussing a deal in her case.

The Wall Street Journal reported that American prosecutors were discussing a deferred prosecution agreement with Meng that would see her admit to some level of wrongdoing and allow her to leave Canada.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau wouldn’t comment on the report Friday, except to say Canada’s absolute priority is the safe release of Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor, whose arrests in China have been widely linked to Canada’s detention of Meng.

Meng is wanted in the United States on charges of fraud and conspiracy based on allegations that she misrepresented Huawei’s relationship with subsidiary Skycom in a 2013 presentation to HSBC, putting the bank at risk of violating U.S. sanctions against Iran.

Meng and Huawei both deny the allegations.

There was no mention of the talks in court on Monday as witness testimony resumed.

Court has heard that Lundie was a senior officer in a satellite RCMP office at Vancouver’s airport and had previously worked for a national security team that brought Mounties together with Canada Border Services Agency officers and other investigators.

He told the court he offered to work on his day off when Meng was arrested to ensure things went smoothly. He suggested the border agency complete its customs and immigration process before the arrest because he didn’t want to step on the organization’s toes.

READ MORE: U.S. DOJ: ‘No comment’ on reports department seeking plea deal with Meng Wanzhou

Richard Peck, one of Meng’s lawyers, read an email from a senior Mountie that identified Lundie as an RCMP contact for the FBI.

Lundie agreed that was true but said he never saw himself as a lead on the case, only as assisting the unit tasked with Meng’s arrest.

“Assisting the FBI, given my background and what I’m used to, this is a very uncomfortable position to be in. This is not what we do,” Lundie said.

“But you did,” Peck said.

Lundie agreed that he communicated with the FBI that day.

Lundie has testified that in his previous role with the national security team, it was normal to work with other investigative units, but his duties changed when he moved to the Richmond detachment, which operates the satellite office at the airport.

“I’m in a different role here. I worked for a detachment, so that’s different,” he said.

Peck asked him if he had any concerns about the information he shared with the FBI.

“I didn’t pass information I shouldn’t have.”

Meng’s lawyers are seeking evidence through the hearings to support an abuse of process claim. They allege that the RCMP and border officers conducted a covert criminal investigation at the behest of U.S. authorities under the guise of a routine immigration exam.

Lundie told the court that during a meeting between the border agency and RCMP officers before Meng’s arrest, he spoke about a legal avenue through which the RCMP could request information related to a border exam.

Peck asked why he would raise a way of sharing information if he had no intention to glean what was learned from the exam.

“My intent was to tell them not to interfere at all,” Lundie said.

The border exam ultimately took almost three hours and Peck asked Lundie if he was concerned by the time it was taking.

“I understand the optics of it taking as long as it did. It would have been better if it had not. But no, no I didn’t,” Lundie said.

Peck challenged Lundie on the purpose of the border exam.

“This exam by the CBSA, I suggest to you, was orchestrated to gain information from her,” Peck said.

“No,” Lundie replied.

Peck suggested the content of the exam could be shared later through the legal mechanism Lundie raised with officers earlier that day. And the information would be of interest to the FBI, not the RCMP, Peck said.

“No,” Lundie said.

Amy Smart, The Canadian Press


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Want to support local journalism during the pandemic? Make a donation here.

FBIHuaweiRCMP

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Terry Keogh, an RDN Transit driver, used his paramedic skills the morning of Jan. 22 after coming across an unconscious woman along his route in downtown Nanaimo. (RDN Transit photo)
RDN Transit driver stops his bus and helps get overdosing woman breathing again

Former EMT from Ireland performed CPR on a woman in downtown Nanaimo on Friday

Peter Crema and Harmony Gray (from left), past participants of the Nanaimo Art Gallery’s Code Switching teen art group, at work in ArtLab in 2019. The NAG will be expanding the space thanks to a $75,000 arts infrastructure program grant. (Bulletin file photo)
Nanaimo Art Gallery, Nanaimo Aboriginal Centre receive new arts infrastructure funding

Province announces recipients of funding through B.C. Arts Council program

Angela Waldick is the new team photographer for the Nanaimo NightOwls. (Nanaimo NightOwls photo)
Half-blind photographer will help Nanaimo’s new baseball team look picture-perfect

NightOwls announce partnership with Angela Waldick of Nightengales Photography

Emergency crews were called to a crash involving a hatchback and a taxi minivan at the intersection of Fitzwilliam, Pine and Third streets on Friday afternoon. (Greg Sakaki/News Bulletin)
Driver hurt as taxi and hatchback crash in Nanaimo

Collision happened Friday at intersection of Fitzwilliam, Pine and Third streets

A person experiencing homelessness in downtown Nanaimo last week. (News Bulletin photo)
LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Change approach to combatting homelessness

Letter writers express frustration with status quo

Emergency crews were called to a crash involving a hatchback and a taxi minivan at the intersection of Fitzwilliam, Pine and Third streets on Friday afternoon. (Greg Sakaki/News Bulletin)
Driver hurt as taxi and hatchback crash in Nanaimo

Collision happened Friday at intersection of Fitzwilliam, Pine and Third streets

Chief Public Health Officer Theresa Tam speaks during a daily briefing in Ottawa. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld)
31 cases of COVID-19 variants detected in Canada: Health officials

Dr. Theresa Tam made announces 13 more variant COVID-19 cases in Canada

Daily COVID-19 cases reported to each B.C. health region, to Jan. 20, 2021. Island Health in blue, Northern Health green, Interior Health orange, Vancouver Coastal in red and Fraser Health in purple. (B.C. Centre for Disease Control)
B.C.’s COVID-19 infection rate stays stable with 508 cases Friday

Vaccine delivered to more than 110,000 high-risk people

Black Press file photo
Investigation at remote burned-out Vancouver Island cabin reveals human remains

Identity of victim not released, believed to be the owner of an SUV vehicle found parked nearby

Nanaimo City Hall. (News Bulletin file photo)
City of Nanaimo councillors like new sustainable buying policy

Finance and audit committee recommends council approve new procurement policy

Danielle Groenendijk raised more than twice her goal for Parkinson Canada. (Photo submitted)
VIU volleyball athlete doubles fundraising goal for Parkinson’s

Daily runs over 30 days by Groenendijk add up to 254 kilometres

An Atlantic salmon is seen during a Department of Fisheries and Oceans fish health audit at the Okisollo fish farm near Campbell River, B.C. in 2018. The First Nations Leadership Council says an attempt by industry to overturn the phasing out of salmon farms in the Discovery Islands in contrary to their inherent Title and Rights. (THE CANADIAN PRESS /Jonathan Hayward photo)
First Nations Leadership Council denounces attempt to overturn salmon farm ban

B.C.’s producers filed for a judicial review of the Discovery Islands decision Jan. 18

More than 100 B.C. fishermen, fleet leaders, First Nations leaders and other salmon stakeholders are holding a virtual conference Jan. 21-22 to discuss a broad-range of issues threatening the commercial salmon fishery. (Black Press file photo)
B.C. commercial salmon fishermen discuss cures for an industry on the brink

Two-day virtual conference will produce key reccomendations for DFO

Premier John Horgan leaves the podium following his first press conference of the year as he comments on various questions from the media in the Press Gallery at B.C. Legislature in Victoria, B.C., on Monday, January 13, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
Interprovincial travel restrictions a no-go, Horgan says after reviewing legal options

The B.C. NDP government sought legal advice as concerns of travel continue

Most Read