Local Salvation Army workers assist after Cache Creek flooding

Two from Abbotsford are among the 20 Sally Ann workers from across the province who are helping with relief efforts

A neighbourhood in Cache Creek is shown on Monday following the flash flood that took place on Saturday.

Two people from Abbotsford are among 20 Salvation Army workers who are assisting with relief efforts in Cache Creek, which was hit by a devastating flash flood on Saturday.

Deb Lowell, public relations director, and John McEwan, divisional emergency disaster services director, will be among those assisting in the Interior village, which Premier Christy Clark visited earlier on Tuesday.

Lowell said the provincial Salvation Army has sent out two emergency vehicles and has been providing meals in the area since the start of the disaster.

She said the agency will provide other practical support where needed and “offer hope in the midst of very difficult circumstances.”

VIDEO: ‘Clark tours Cache Creek flooding, Province opens disaster assistance‘ (May 26, 2015)

Lowell said the Sally Ann workers will also be on hand during a town hall meeting on Tuesday night.

The violent storm dumped 30 to 40 mm of rain in the area in less than an hour on Saturday, resulting in flash flooding that caused millions of dollars in damages to homes and businesses.

The flood damaged about 60 homes, knocking some off their foundations and filling them with mud and debris.

On Monday, an evacuation order was given for 23 homes, with another 40 subject to an “evacuation alert,” meaning the occupants could be asked to leave on short notice.

Chevron supports fundraising campaign:

By donating at least $125 toward the Cache Creek Emergency Fund, Chevron will provide a $25 gift certificate that can be redeemed at any Chevron retail station across British Columbia. To claim this perk or for more information, click on the Chevron logo displayed in the right-hand column. Limited number of gift certificates available. See link below.

A BlackPress4Good crowdfunding campaign is underway at https://fundrazr.com/campaigns/8zs29

Just Posted

Apartment building with affordable units proposed for central Nanaimo

Building on Pryde Avenue will include accessible suites

Remains of two people found in Ucluelet

Officials have not said whether or not the remains belong to Ryan Daley or Dan Archbald

B.C. turns up the heat

Environment Canada has issued a special weather statement for most the province due to high temperatures

Mediator wants to be part of a city council that can get along

Guy Beaulieu will officially announce on Tuesday that he’s running for Nanaimo city council

Regional District of Nanaimo to create conceptual designs for fire halls

Committee endorses standardized design of buildings

Canada won’t ‘play politics’ on U.S. migrant children policy

The U.S. government is under fire over its ”zero tolerance” policy

Career connections coming to mid Island this week

The Black Press Extreme Education and Career Fair is coming up Thursday, June 21, in Nanaimo

Nanaimo Aboriginal Centre affordable housing holds official opening

Housing complex on Bowen Road features units that are passive house certified

City urged to support action plan on homelessness crisis

Nanaimo city council presented with reports on homeless count and homelessness action plan

Late goal gives England 2-1 win over Tunisia

At the last World Cup in 2014, England couldn’t even win a game

Canadian military police officer pleads not guilty to sex assault

Sgt. Kevin MacIntyre, 48, entered his plea today at a court martial proceeding in Halifax

Cheers erupt as Federal Court judge approves historic gay purge settlement

Gay military veterans said they were interrogated, harassed and spied on because of their sexuality

Helping B.C.’s helpers cope

The MRT has helped almost 7,000 first responders and street workers in 57 communities in B.C.

Border officials argue B.C. man’s Facebook posts threat to Canada’s security

A B.C. Supreme Court judge acquitted Othman Hamdan of terrorism charges last September

Most Read