Walnut Grove resident Tricia Hill is hoping telling the story of how her dog Frankie, a two-and-a-half year-old Chihuahua was mauled to death by two pit bulls, will toughen dangerous dog regulations. (Special to Langley Advance Times)

Walnut Grove resident Tricia Hill is hoping telling the story of how her dog Frankie, a two-and-a-half year-old Chihuahua was mauled to death by two pit bulls, will toughen dangerous dog regulations. (Special to Langley Advance Times)

B.C. woman launches online campaign for tougher laws after dog killed by 2 pit bulls

‘Justice For Frankie’ website aims to beef up dangerous dog laws

A B.C. woman whose two-and-a-half year old Chihuahua was mauled to death by two pit bulls is lobbying for stronger dangerous dog laws.

Tricia Hill set up the “Justice For Frankie” page along with a change.org petition “Dog Owner Legislation Reform”to lobby for stronger dangerous dog laws.

“The point of this petition is to create legislation that bridges the gap between criminal law and animal control law,” the petition statement of purpose declared.

“Dog ownership legislation needs a reform.”

On Thursday, July 15, around 2 p.m. Hill was taking Frankie for a walk in Langley’s Walnut Grove neighbourhood while she waited for a takeout order to be ready.

They were passing by the parking lot of the Sandman Inn hotel at 202nd St. and 88th Ave. when Hill heard “what sounded like two chains dragging,” and saw the pit bulls.

She tucked Frankie under her arm “like a football” and was leaving when the dogs attacked.

“I was tackled from behind” by one dog, while the other went after Frankie, dragging him from her grip.

Hill managed to fight them off and get Frankie back, but the dogs attacked a second time, injuring Hill and killing Frankie.

READ ALSO: Higher fines for owners of dogs that kill other dogs in Fraser Valley Regional District

By then, the owner of the dogs, a woman, had arrived, Hill recalled, but didn’t call her dogs off or attempt to intervene.

“It was brutal,” Hill told Black Press.

“It felt like [it went on] forever. The whole time, I was screaming for help.”

Hill suffered bruises and bite marks to her hand and under her chin.

While the injuries will heal, Hill doubts she will ever recover from the trauma of witnessing Frankie’s death.

“No one should ever have to see that,” Hill said.

“I’m never going to get over it.”

She said Frankie was a rescue dog from Korea, the only survivor from his litter.

Hill described him as a bright, happy, outgoing dog, “a human in a dog’s body.”

READ ALSO: Small dog attacked by pit bull at Salmon Arm beach

Faye Wightman, interim executive director of Langley Animal Protection Society (LAPS) , the animal control service provider for both the Township and City of Langley, confirmed LAPS investigated an incident on July 15th involving three dogs that ended with the death of one dog, but could not say more, owing to privacy concerns.

“Appropriate action is being taken,” Wightman told the Langley Advance Times.

“Define appropriate,” Hill commented.

Langley Township’s animal control bylaw, as posted online, sets out a potential fine of $5,000 for the owner of a “dangerous dog,” defined as one that has “killed or seriously injured” a person or domestic animal.”

Under the bylaw, an animal control officer may detain the dog pending court proceedings to seek an order to have the dog humanely destroyed.


Is there more to the story? Email: dan.ferguson@langleyadvancetimes.com

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