Condolences sent to Norway

As Norwegians mourn the deaths of 76 victims in the July 22 bombing and shooting massacre, Nanaimo residents have a chance to send along their thoughts and prayers.

As Norwegians mourn the deaths of 76 victims in the July 22 bombing and shooting massacre, Nanaimo residents have a chance to send along their thoughts and prayers.

Sons of Norway  North Star Lodge No. 63 Nanaimo has set up a book of condolences in the lobby of Bowen Park Social Centre for people to sign.

Kathie Furuness, lodge president, said the book will be available to sign for two to three weeks.

“We’ll watch how it fills up and if it looks like people are still signing in the middle of August, we may even start another one,” she said. “We’ll then forward it along with others being done throughout our district in British Columbia.”

Anders Behring Breivik, 32, was charged with terrorism for the bombing outside government headquarters in Oslo, Norway, and a shooting spree on an island youth camp. He pleaded not guilty to terror charges.

“It was totally horrifying when I heard about it so I really started tuning into the news broadcasts,” said Furuness. “As things unfolded, I thought ‘things like that just don’t happen in Norway’. They’re very gentle, peace-loving people and don’t have horrid thoughts.”

 

As Norwegians mourn the deaths of 76 victims in the July 22 bombing and shooting massacre, Nanaimo residents have a chance to send along their thoughts and prayers.

Sons of Norway  North Star Lodge No. 63 Nanaimo has set up a book of condolences in the lobby of Bowen Park Social Centre for people to sign.

Kathie Furuness, lodge president, said the book will be available to sign for two to three weeks.

“We’ll watch how it fills up and if it looks like people are still signing in the middle of August, we may even start another one,” she said. “We’ll then forward it along with others being done throughout our district in British Columbia.”

Anders Behring Breivik, 32, was charged with terrorism for the bombing outside government headquarters in Oslo, Norway, and a shooting spree on an island youth camp. He pleaded not guilty to terror charges.

“It was totally horrifying when I heard about it so I really started tuning into the news broadcasts,” said Furuness. “As things unfolded, I thought ‘things like that just don’t happen in Norway’. They’re very gentle, peace-loving people and don’t have horrid thoughts.”