Wall Street in Nanaimo, where the city has opened a daytime extreme weather space operated by the Nanaimo 7-10 Club Society. (News Bulletin file photo)

Wall Street in Nanaimo, where the city has opened a daytime extreme weather space operated by the Nanaimo 7-10 Club Society. (News Bulletin file photo)

City of Nanaimo opens extreme cold weather space at Caledonia Park

Space will be open on days when the cold is severe enough to be a threat to ‘life or health’

The city has set up another place for people experiencing homelessness to be able to keep warm this winter.

The City of Nanaimo, in a press release, announced that through a partnership with operating partner the Nanaimo 7-10 Club Society, a temporary daytime extreme weather space is now open at Caledonia Park.

The space opened Monday, Dec. 27 and will operate from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. “only on days when cold weather conditions are deemed severe enough to present a substantial threat to the life or health of vulnerable persons,” the release noted.

The space can accommodate 10 to 12 people.

There are two other warming centres operating this winter in Nanaimo, neither funded by the city. Rise Bridge is operating a centre at 380 Terminal Ave. from 5:45-7:45 a.m. and 3:30-9:30 p.m. daily and the Canadian Mental Health Association is operating a centre at 489 Wallace St. from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. daily.

A winter overnight shelter operated by the John Howard Society and Nanaimo Family Life Association is open at St. Peter’s Church, and the Unitarian Shelter on Townsite Road and the Salvation Army New Hope Centre on Nicol Street are open year-round.

“Having a number of choices to shelter in extreme weather ensures more individuals the opportunity to utilize services in which they feel comfortable doing so,” said Gord Fuller, 7-10 Club executive director, in the release.

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editor@nanaimobulletin.com

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