City considers adding internal auditor

City hall is considering an internal auditor position to ensure that council priorities are met with financial prudence

City hall is considering an internal auditor position to ensure that council priorities are met with financial prudence and that every dime of the taxpayers’ money is spent efficiently and with purpose.

Nanaimo Mayor John Ruttan said an internal auditor would help build trust between taxpayers and the elected officials who spend the money, and hold council more accountable for its decisions.

“I totally support an internal auditor and it is something we should definitely look at,” said Ruttan. “An auditor would be somewhat independent of city staff and could make his or her own assessment of what the city is doing in regards to diligence, while unbiasedly giving opinions back to elected personnel about how they see the city progressing.

“Some people still question everything we do, but we are trying, in my opinion, to be very open and very transparent in how we spend taxpayer money.”

An internal auditor was recommended as a higher service level in the 2012-2016 financial plan. The position is common in other Canadian municipalities.

“An internal auditor is a way to build trust with the community,” said Al Kenning, city manager. “There is growing concern as to how the city spends $160 million annually and this position can address those concerns.”

An internal auditor would report directly to top levels of city staff and city council.

Kenning noted that the province has also created a municipal auditor position to oversee municipal spending, but said the positions wouldn’t overlap.

The provincial auditor is more concerned with municipalities following Local Government Act regulations and wouldn’t likely have the time to focus on any single municipality, while an internal auditor would have intimate access to Nanaimo’s accounts.

“They’re not necessarily the same mandate,” said Kenning.

It is estimated the position would cost as much as $100,000 and would be a union-exempt position.

Coun. Jim Kipp said considering the amount of money council is responsible for and increasingly complicated financial transactions, it makes sense to have another pair of eyes on the books.

“As a councillor, I’ve spent about $750 million,” said Kipp.

Ruttan said if the position is approved by council, the city will move quickly to fill the position.

“We’re trying to move along as quickly as we can,” he said. “It’s certainly on the radar to get it going and get that position activated as early as we can and we see this as an important step. It should be seen by the public as our interest in making sure we are accountable for what happens.”

reporter2@nanaimobulletin.com

City hall is considering an internal auditor position to ensure that council priorities are met with financial prudence and that every dime of the taxpayers’ money is spent efficiently and with purpose.

Nanaimo Mayor John Ruttan said an internal auditor would help build trust between taxpayers and the elected officials who spend the money, and hold council more accountable for its decisions.

“I totally support an internal auditor and it is something we should definitely look at,” said Ruttan. “An auditor would be somewhat independent of city staff and could make his or her own assessment of what the city is doing in regards to diligence, while unbiasedly giving opinions back to elected personnel about how they see the city progressing.

“Some people still question everything we do, but we are trying, in my opinion, to be very open and very transparent in how we spend taxpayer money.”

An internal auditor was recommended as a higher service level in the 2012-2016 financial plan. The position is common in other Canadian municipalities.

“An internal auditor is a way to build trust with the community,” said Al Kenning, city manager. “There is growing concern as to how the city spends $160 million annually and this position can address those concerns.”

An internal auditor would report directly to top levels of city staff and city council.

Kenning noted that the province has also created a municipal auditor position to oversee municipal spending, but said the positions wouldn’t overlap.

The provincial auditor is more concerned with municipalities following Local Government Act regulations and wouldn’t likely have the time to focus on any single municipality, while an internal auditor would have intimate access to Nanaimo’s accounts.

“They’re not necessarily the same mandate,” said Kenning.

It is estimated the position would cost as much as $100,000 and would be a union-exempt position.

Coun. Jim Kipp said considering the amount of money council is responsible for and increasingly complicated financial transactions, it makes sense to have another pair of eyes on the books.

“As a councillor, I’ve spent about $750 million,” said Kipp.

Ruttan said if the position is approved by council, the city will move quickly to fill the position.

“We’re trying to move along as quickly as we can,” he said. “It’s certainly on the radar to get it going and get that position activated as early as we can and we see this as an important step. It should be seen by the public as our interest in making sure we are accountable for what happens.”

reporter2@nanaimobulletin.com

Just Posted

UPDATED: Four arrested after report of shots fired in Nanaimo

RCMP arrest four suspects in high-risk takedown in Cedar

Nanaimo Chamber Orchestra goes ‘Basically Baroque’ to start new season

French horn player Keon Birney of the Vancouver Island Symphony is guest soloist

Teacher says student was ‘happy’ to watch smudging ceremony at Vancouver Island school

B.C. Supreme Court in Nanaimo hearing case over indigenous cultural practice in Alberni classroom

Talks between Western Forest Products and union break down

No more negotiations imminent between United Steelworkers 1-1937 and company

City of Nanaimo to issue alert as it moves to new emergency information system

Municipality will send out reminder Thursday, Nov. 21, asking residents to switch to new system

VIDEO: UBC exchange students offered $1,000 to help with leaving Hong Kong

The university said 31 of its students were attending four universities in Hong Kong

Woman calls 911 to say she was late for train, asks Ontario police for ‘emergency ride’

Peel Regional Police received more than 180,000 improper calls so far this year

It could take you 218 years to save up for a house in this B.C. city

It would take 27 years in the most affordable city in the Lower Mainland

Victim of downtown Courtenay assault dies from injuries

Person of interest identified by RCMP

‘Actors can play any roles’: Debate over ‘colour-blind’ casting after Victoria lawsuit

Tenyjah Indra McKenna filed a complaint over racially-motivated casting

Infants more vulnerable to measles than previously thought: Canadian study

Babies typically don’t receive the measles vaccine until they are 12 months old

Shatner, Obomsawin among 39 inductees to Order of Canada today

Shatner is being given one of Canada’s highest civilian honours for his 60-year career

John Mann, singer and songwriter of group Spirit of the West dead at 57

Mann died peacefully in Vancouver on Wednesday from early onset Alzheimer’s

VIDEO: B.C. high school’s turf closed indefinitely as plastic blades pollute waterway

Greater Victoria resident stumbles on plastic contamination from Oak Bay High

Most Read