(Facebook photo/Strathcona Provincial Park)

Campers can get one site for the price of two in BC Parks this summer

B.C. campers disgruntled by full rates being charged for half-capacity double campsites

BC Parks is getting flak from disgruntled campers being forced to pay full price for double campsites despite occupancy being reduced to half their original capacity.

When provincial campsites reopened June 1, double site limits were reduced from two camping parties, each of up to four adults and four children, to one due to revised regulations to accommodate physical distancing.

That’s now the same eight-person occupancy limit that applies to single campsites, but the fees for double sites remain what they were — twice that of a single.

A double site usually allows for family and friends to camp together, and is specifically designed to allow two parties to camp in close proximity.

A lot of citizens have taken to BC parks’ social media sites to seek further clarifications and to voice their discontent.

B.C. resident Valerie Roy had booked a double before the pandemic and had to ask members to drop out of their trip recently after the new regulations were announced.

She was “disappointed” that parks were maintaining full rates for double sites despite allowing the same number of occupants as a single site.

“I feel like it’s a cash grab, provincial parks are taking advantage of the situation by assessing the same fee,” said Roy.

The new occupancy policy also poses a significant challenge for large families. Those with more than 4 children have either had to cancel altogether or get lucky with finding another site in the campground open during the same time.

Most reservations made prior to COVID-19 are eligible for full refund upon cancellations before June 15.

But fresh reservation have not been easy since the Discover Camping’ website went live again on May 25. On the same day, BC Parks announced a site crash due to heavy traffic and large volumes of bookings.

This year, online reservations can be made for up to two months in advance.

Camp sites are also open only to B.C.residents and any bookings made by non-B.C. residents after May 25 will be subject to immediate cancellations without a refund.

Callers to the reservation line with pre-existing reservations for doubles were being told their choices were to adhere to the new regulations, book an additional site, or cancel if neither was a viable option.

Ministry of Environment spokesperson, David Karn, told the Mirror that all reservation holders with a double campsite booking were contacted to inform them of the new rules.

“Visitors who choose to keep a double site booking with the limited number of people are charged the regular double site rate as extra space is still available, and additional vehicles and camping units on double sites are still permitted,” said Karn.

READ ALSO: COVID-19: B.C. park reservations surge as campgrounds reopen

READ ALSO: Only British Columbians allowed to camp in provincial parks this summer amid COVID-19

Campingparks

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Alzheimer’s society offering online support for caregivers in Nanaimo

Webinars explore ‘mindfulness’ in caring for dementia patients

Shopping resumes aboard Nanaimo ferry sailings

B.C. Ferries reopens gift shops on Queen of Cowichan and Queen of Oak Bay

City of Nanaimo reports on its salaries, expenses and payments

Municipality files statement of financial information with B.C. government

City of Nanaimo challenges families to Instagram their park explorations

ParkIt challenge set up to offer prizes to cap off days at the park

Nanaimo RCMP want speeding motorists to ‘slow the blazes down’

Police raise alarm after seeing 400-per cent rise in excessive speeding tickets last month

B.C. sees 25 new COVID-19 cases, community exposure tracked

One death, outbreaks remain in two long-term care facilities

VIDEO: Alberta man rescues baby eagle believed to be drowning in East Kootenay lake

Brett Bacon was boating on a lake in Windermere when he spotted the baby eagle struggling in the water

Vancouver Island business ad unintentionally features OK gesture linked to white supremacy

Innocuous ‘OK’ gesture in cleaning franchise advertisement gets flak on social media for ‘supposedly’ promoting white supremacy

Minivan driver’s speed a factor in fatal 2018 Malahat crash

Driver was travelling at 110 km/h in a construction zone

Comox Valley RCMP looking for missing woman

Ami Guthrie was last seen in Courtenay in early July

Conservationists raise concerns over state of care for grizzly cubs transferred to B.C. zoo

‘Let them be assessed now before their fate is sealed,’ urges B.C. conservationist Barb Murray

B.C.’s COVID-19 job recovery led by tourism, finance minister says

Okanagan a bright spot for in-province visitor economy

Limit police access to lethal weapons in Indigenous communities: Justice Summit

Grassroots-organized National Indigenous Justice Summit was a free-to-attend two-day videoconference

City of Nanaimo takes inventory of its land for official community plan review

Report recommends high-density residential development, identifies shortage of industrial land

Most Read