A hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, site as seen from the air near Fort St. John, B.C. JeremyWilliams.ca

B.C. regulator says fracking caused earthquakes near Fort St. John

Hydraulic fracturing involves injecting water, sand and chemicals into a well under pressure to break up tight underground rock and free trapped oil and gas.

The B.C. Oil and Gas Commission has blamed fracking for three earthquakes in northeastern B.C. last month.

The provincial regulator says the events 20 kilometres south of Fort St. John on Nov. 29 occurred because of fluid injections during hydraulic fracturing at a Canadian Natural Resources Ltd. wellsite.

The events, which were felt but caused no surface damage, measured 3.4, 4.0 and 4.5 magnitude.

Fracking operations within the lower Montney formation were suspended after the earthquakes and are to remain suspended at the multi-well pad involved pending the results of a detailed technical review.

The commission says seven wells into the upper Montney formation had previously been drilled and completed by the Calgary-based company at the well pad with no seismic events larger than magnitude 2.5 detected.

The immediate shut down of operations is required when an induced seismic event in that region reaches or exceeds a 3.0 magnitude.

Hydraulic fracturing involves injecting water, sand and chemicals into a well under pressure to break up tight underground rock and free trapped oil and gas.

Read more: 4.5 magnitude earthquake strikes near Fort St. John

Read more: Northeast B.C. community cut off by slide has heat, power, but no answers

Companies in this article: (TSX:CNQ)

The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Nanaimo air compressor business helps manufacture parts for COVID-19 fight

VMAC has crafted parts now being tested in prototype ventilator created at University of Minnesota

‘Stay strong’ graffiti message offers encouragement in downtown Nanaimo

Boarded-up Modern Café regains some of its colour during COVID-19 pandemic

Couple celebrates anniversary through a window at Nanaimo seniors’ home

Frank and Rena Phillips marked occasion at Nanaimo Seniors Village this week while social distancing

Beefs & Bouquets, April 1

To submit a beef or a bouquet to the Nanaimo News Bulletin, e-mail editor@nanaimobulletin.com

RDN enters into Stage 2 water restrictions, City of Nanaimo enters Stage 1

Stage 2 sees odd-number addresses watering on odd-number days and vice-versa

‘We will get through this’: B.C. sees new COVID-19 death, but 57% have recovered

A total of 1,066 people have tested positive for the novel coronavirus

A look at some of the B.C. inventors creating life-saving tools in fight against COVID-19

Groups across B.C. are working together to create what they hope will help people affected by the pandemic

Thieves taking advantage of empty streets, say Nanaimo RCMP

Police offer crime prevention reminders during COVID-19 pandemic

‘There can be no ambiguity’: Travellers brought home to B.C. must self-isolate

Health Minister Adrian Dix said the mandatory isolation must be abided by

55+ BC Games cancelled amid COVID-19 concerns

Greater Victoria set to host 2021 event

BC Hydro offers three-month bill ‘holiday’ for those affected by COVID-19

Industrial customers can defer half of their power bills

Association launches French-language games, online tools for families learning at home

Games, culture and vocabulary included in new virtual resources

Belle from ‘Beauty and the Beast’ entertains home-bound kids in Cowichan Bay

Alora Killam, 16, played the part in musical two years ago

Some April Fool’s Day jokes bring much-needed laughter; others tone deaf to COVID-19

Police are warning the public not to use the ongoing pandemic as a punchline

Most Read