Conductors and engineers employed with CP Rail announced a strike vote authorization for April 21 late last week. Wikipedia photo.

B.C. conductors, engineers with CP Rail authorize strike action

CP Rail, Teamsters union negotiating new labour agreement that expired in December.

The union representing engineers and conductors employed with CP Rail voted to authorize strike action as early as April 21, according to an announcement made last week.

With a 94 per cent margin in favour, the strike authorization affects 3,000 members across Canada and ‘a few hundred’ in the southeast corner of BC, according to a Teamsters Canada Rail Conference spokesperson.

The last contract between the two sides expired at the end of December 2017, while a one-year ratification vote was rejected by union members in November after an initial agreement was struck a few months earlier.

The union argues that rising profits are based off cuts, layoffs, closures and working crews to the point of exhaustion, according to a press release. The union also charges that CP’s profits in 2017 reached $2.4 billion, even while sales were stagnant.

“Despite our best efforts to negotiate in good faith, we have come to a point where Teamsters are prepared to go on strike for the third time in six years to obtain a fair and reasonable contract renewal,” said Doug Finnson, President, TCRC. “We will do everything in our power to reach a negotiated settlement at CP, but one that is acceptable to our members and that addresses the major issues that exist with this employer.”

The TCRC press release accuses CP Rail of forcing train crews to be available 24 hours a day, seven days a week and pushing them to ‘work well beyond their point of exhaustion.’

CP Rail disputes that claim, in an email response by a company spokesperson.

“Contrary to what was said in the Teamsters’ press release, conductors’ and engineers’ Collective Agreements provide the ability to take 24 hours rest at home upon the completion of a train trip,” reads an emailed statement from the company.

“Furthermore, and despite what has been suggested by the Union, our engineers and conductors have many voluntary rest opportunities, as documented in their collective agreements, to ensure they get the time off they need between shifts and they are not forced to be available 24/7.”

The CP Rail statement says the company is continuing talks with the TCRC – Train & Engine, pointing to a number of successful agreements made in 2017 with unions representing the Canadian Pacific Police Association, TCRC Maintenance of Way Employees Division, and administrative and intermodal employees with the United Steelworkers Local 1976.

“Negotiations with the Teamsters Canada Rail Conference – Train & Engine, representing our Canadian engineers and conductors, continue in earnest,” according to the statement. “That said, despite our best efforts and commitment to fair, equitable and early bargaining, a significant gap remains.”

The TCRC notes that a ratification vote is currently underway for a new contract between it’s members and Canadian National, a rival competitor of CP Rail.

Last year, the company shifted 73 locomotive engineer and conductor jobs from Cranbrook to Sparwood in order to make operations more efficient.

Just Posted

Regional District of Nanaimo to create conceptual designs for fire halls

Committee endorses standardized design of buildings

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Nobody want to live in tents

It’s impossible to lump every member of Discontent City in the same category, says letter writer

Nanaimo mayoral candidate Smith announces he’ll try for city council, instead

‘There’s no prize for second place,’ says Norm Smith

Discontent City campers say there’s room for cars and RVs

Organizers open up Nanaimo homeless camp to ‘hidden homeless’

Labour pains: cheap help is hard to find on Vancouver Island

Big Read: high demand for workers, lack of affordable living mean imperfect storm for businesses

MULTIMEDIA: Life’s amusing at Miners’ Heritage Picnic

Nanaimo South End Community Association’s annual picnic goes for 26th year

Nanaimo Aboriginal Centre affordable housing holds official opening

Housing complex on Bowen Road features units that are passive house certified

City urged to support action plan on homelessness crisis

Nanaimo city council presented with reports on homeless count and homelessness action plan

B.C. NHL prospect expected to make ‘full recovery’ after incident in Calgary

Jordy Bellerive was injured in a reported house fire Saturday night

BC Lions defensive back Marcell Young levels streaker in home opener

Young hit the fan near one of the 45-yard lines

Police: Taxi driver who hit 8 Moscow pedestrians fell asleep

Two Mexican World Cup fans were among those hit

B.C. VIEWS: Orphans of our urban drug culture neglected again

Child advocate Bernard Richard leaves B.C. with harsh message

From marijuana beer to pot cookies, Canadian companies creating cannabis edibles

Manufacturers think that edibles will do well with users who don’t want to smoke or vape

Privacy lawyer warns against victim blaming in recent sextortion scams

Perpetrators get sexual photos of the victim and threaten to share them with friends and families

Most Read