B.C. administrator punished for tying boys together at ankles

Principal had tethered students together like a ‘three-legged race’ to help them to get along

A former school administrator in B.C. has been reprimanded for tying two students together at the ankles to try to get them to get along, subsequently triggering memories of residential schools.

According to the B.C. Commisioner for Teacher Regulation, Cheryl Louise Lloyd was consulted by a primary teacher in May of 2015 at an unnamed independent school about two Grade 2 boys who were struggling to get along – in some cases using inappropriate physical contact.

Lloyd suggested that the pair spend a day tied together at the ankle, three-legged-race style, to “help them learn to communicate and work in co-operation with each other.”

She spoke to the students’ parent and caregiver, who agreed with the plan. She then told the boys they would be tied “loosely” together with a strip of a T-shirt for the day of May 14, having to use their words to work together.

Lloyd checked on the two students a number of times during the day, according to documents.

They could untie themselves when one needed to use the washrooms, but had to remain tied together at lunch hour.

According to media reports, the commissioner actually examined this case earlier this year, and ruled the students weren’t treated respectfully, but took no action against the teacher involved. A family member then filed a petition in court to have that ruling reviewed.

In this latest decision, the commissioner called Lloyd’s conduct “not appropriately sensitive” to the history of residential schools, and the impact the approach would have on the community.

Lloyd agreed to be reprimanded and take a course on creating a positive learning environment. In March, she took part in a healing circle with the affected First Nation.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

City reviewing plans for huge Sandstone project in south Nanaimo

Seacliff Properties says it’s been told to be ready for a public hearing this fall

Ferry riders say lower fares are what’s most needed to improve service

Provincial government announces findings of public engagement process

COVID-19 isn’t cancelling this year’s Tour de Rock

Alumni riders will cycle relay sections in their own communities

POLL: Can B.C. hold a provincial election safely during a pandemic?

Can B.C. hold a provincial election safely during a pandemic?… Continue reading

Trail proposed to connect Cedar and Yellow Point

Regional director says project fits with active transportation goals

POLL: Can B.C. hold a provincial election safely during a pandemic?

Can B.C. hold a provincial election safely during a pandemic?… Continue reading

Nanaimo RCMP community policing needs a few good volunteers

Volunteers needed to help Nanaimo RCMP and city deliver crime prevention and safety programs

Protesters march in Nanaimo, calling for greater protection of forests and watersheds

March for the Forests happened downtown on Friday afternoon

City of Nanaimo begins project planning for multimillion-dollar public works yard upgrades

Councillors vote to reallocate $200,000 to develop architectural concepts and cost estimates

Nanaimo residents ticketed for putting out garbage bins the night before pickup

Conservation officers say they issued seven tickets this week, as warnings weren’t having an impact

Accused in Makayla Chang’s murder sees next court date in October

Steven Michael Bacon faces first-degree murder charge in killing of Nanaimo teen

Regional District of Nanaimo looks to create its own flag

Staff created makeshift flag earlier this year for a conference that ended up getting cancelled

Nanaimo senior defrauded out of $14,000 in ‘grandson scam’

80-year-old victim was told her grandson was out-of-province and in legal trouble

VIDEO: B.C. to launch mouth-rinse COVID-19 test for kids

Test involves swishing and gargling saline in mouth and no deep-nasal swab

Most Read