Galaxy Cinema

Movie night raising money for United Way

NANAIMO - United Way's annual Starlight Film Festival takes place at Galaxy Cinemas.

Watching movies, hanging out with friends and staying up all night is nothing out of the ordinary for the majority of teens.

But spending an entire night at the movie theatre with friends is definitely out of the ordinary for anyone, let alone teenagers. 

And yet for one night in October that is exactly what teenagers in the Harbour City will be able to do.

On Oct. 10, United Way Central and Northern Vancouver Island will be hosting its annual Starlight Film Festival at Galaxy Cinemas. For a small fee and under the supervision of United Way volunteers, teens can spend the entire night hanging with their friends and watching movies at the movie theatre. 

Among the movies that will be screening at the festival, which runs until 6:30 a.m., are 21 Jump Street, Anchorman 2, Bridesmaids, Grown Ups 2, White House Down and World War Z. One of the movie screens will be set up so teenagers can play Xbox games. There will also be pizza, soda and popcorn available throughout the night.

Kyla Karakochuk, marketing and communications officer for United Way Central and Northern Vancouver Island, says the event is a great night out for teenagers.

“They get to watch movies and hang out with their friends all night,” she said.

There will also be pizza, soda and popcorn available throughout the night. Volunteers will be on hand throughout the night to ensure that teens do not leave the theatre during the night and that they get picked up safely in the morning.

The Starlight Film Festival is one of a number of fundraising events for the United Way. Proceeds from the festival will help fund the charity’s 33 Central Island region programs such as a youth suicide prevention program, in-school mentorship programs and an anti-bullying program. Last year the festival raised $10,500.

“It is a pretty big event,” said Karakochuk, who will be on hand for a portion of the event.

Teens may bring sleeping bags and pyjamas and the event is a drug- and alcohol-free environment.

The admission fee is $20. Parents should drop the teens off at Galaxy Cinema between 11:45 p.m. (Oct. 9) and 12:15 a.m. (Oct. 10). The doors close at 12:30 a.m. Parents can pick up teens at 6:30 a.m. (Oct. 10).

For more information, please visit www.uwcnvi.ca.

arts@nanaimobulletin.com
Twitter: @npescod

Just Posted

Apartment building with affordable units proposed for central Nanaimo

Building on Pryde Avenue will include accessible suites

Remains of two people found in Ucluelet

Officials have not said whether or not the remains belong to Ryan Daley or Dan Archbald

B.C. turns up the heat

Environment Canada has issued a special weather statement for most the province due to high temperatures

Mediator wants to be part of a city council that can get along

Guy Beaulieu will officially announce on Tuesday that he’s running for Nanaimo city council

Regional District of Nanaimo to create conceptual designs for fire halls

Committee endorses standardized design of buildings

Canada won’t ‘play politics’ on U.S. migrant children policy

The U.S. government is under fire over its ”zero tolerance” policy

Career connections coming to mid Island this week

The Black Press Extreme Education and Career Fair is coming up Thursday, June 21, in Nanaimo

Nanaimo Aboriginal Centre affordable housing holds official opening

Housing complex on Bowen Road features units that are passive house certified

City urged to support action plan on homelessness crisis

Nanaimo city council presented with reports on homeless count and homelessness action plan

Late goal gives England 2-1 win over Tunisia

At the last World Cup in 2014, England couldn’t even win a game

Canadian military police officer pleads not guilty to sex assault

Sgt. Kevin MacIntyre, 48, entered his plea today at a court martial proceeding in Halifax

Cheers erupt as Federal Court judge approves historic gay purge settlement

Gay military veterans said they were interrogated, harassed and spied on because of their sexuality

Helping B.C.’s helpers cope

The MRT has helped almost 7,000 first responders and street workers in 57 communities in B.C.

Border officials argue B.C. man’s Facebook posts threat to Canada’s security

A B.C. Supreme Court judge acquitted Othman Hamdan of terrorism charges last September

Most Read