Skye Skagfeld’s touch with the brush can be seen in her paintings. (Don Bodger/Black Press)

Exhibit showcases one side of Cedar artist’s wide-ranging personality

Skye Skagfeld draws from life experiences in series of art shows

Not even COVID-19 could mess with the Essence of the Esses.

The alliteratively named art exhibition by Nanaimo’s Skye Skagfeld was supposed to start during the first season starting with S – that being spring – but successfully resurfaced in the second S season of summer during July.

“I had it set up before COVID and then it was shut down,” said the Cedar artist of the originally scheduled show at the St. Joseph’s Art Studios Gallery in Chemainus. “It was here suspended in time and then reopened.”

Thus, the event became Skye Skagfeld’s Soak-Stain Summer Show. There were six dates for viewing in July of her work billed as “a dazzling display of exploration into alternative processes; her latest series of abstract paintings drenched with colour.”

For those who missed it, Essence of the Esses can still be viewed by appointment by contacting Skagfeld by e-mail at skyeskagfeld@hotmail.com.

She’ll also be appearing at the Labyrinth Art Show in Cedar and people can also e-mail for details. Skagfeld will be back at St. Joseph’s where she became one of the first few artist tenants Sept. 23-30 for the equally alliterative event, Euclid Elemental.

The Essence of the Esses not only featured Skagfeld’s work, but her dad’s wood carvings.

“It’s nice to have a bit of 3D with the 2D,” she said. “They kind of complement one another.”

Skagfeld primarily paints acrylic on canvas. When she’s not painting, her profession is teaching English as a second language at Vancouver Island University.

Skagfeld spent about eight years in Singapore among her abundant travels so she’s well-versed in languages. Travel and teaching have both been curtailed since COVID so “now I paint more than I teach,” she laughed. “It’s a good changeover.”

Skagfeld comes by her talents naturally through family members, but didn’t pursue art to any great degree until recent years. Five years after Skagfeld started painting, she also took an introductory class through the Emily Carr University of Art and Design.

With so much uncertainty due to COVID, for the foreseeable future “I think I’m going to keep doing some art, chill out and enjoy the Island,” she said. “I’m happy I’ve done so much travelling.”

Besides Singapore, Skagfeld has been to Paris for a water colour workshop and has travelled to many countries. She went to Toronto last year as the North Island champion of an Art Battle speed competition.

“You have 20 minutes to paint anything you want,” she noted.

As the artists work, patrons move around the easels, closely watching the creative process. The medium is acrylic paint using brushes, palette knives or any non-mechanical implements as tools. At the end of the round, the audience votes for its favourite painting and bids in a silent auction to take the work home.

“It’s super stressful,” Skagfeld pointed out. “It’s equal amounts of fun and stress.”

All the elements of her life taken together are fuel for Skagfeld’s adventurous spirit.

don.bodger@chemainusvalleycourier.ca

Art

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