Diabetes Canada is holding a used clothing drive next week in Nanaimo in commemoration of the discovery of insulin 100 years ago. (Black Press file photo)

Diabetes Canada is holding a used clothing drive next week in Nanaimo in commemoration of the discovery of insulin 100 years ago. (Black Press file photo)

Diabetes Canada holding used clothing drive in honour of insulin’s discovery

Drive will take place Aug. 7 at Real Canadian Superstore at Metral Drive

Diabetes Canada is celebrating a century of insulin with 100 curbside clothing donation drives across the country, including one in Nanaimo.

According to a press release, the charity, which serves Canadians living with diabetes, will hold a “safe and easy curbside clothing donation drive-thru” in Nanaimo on Aug. 7 at the parking lot of the Real Canadian Superstore at 6435 Metral Dr. between 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Nanaimo residents are encouraged to de-clutter at home and donate, the release said.

Gently used clothing will be accepted and with COVID-19 cases still prevalent, donors can remain in their vehicles while masked staff gather bagged or boxed clothing from car trunks, said the press release.

Another drive is scheduled for Sept. 11 at Diabetes Canada’s clothing collection centre at 4166 Departure Bay Rd. and people are also welcome to donate at one of the charity’s donation bins.

All net proceeds will go toward Diabetes Canada’s charitable work and the support it offers 11 million Canadians with diabetes and pre-diabetes.

Even though insulin was discovered 100 years ago, it is not a cure, said Sean Shannon, president and CEO of the National Diabetes Trust, in the press release, adding that one in three Canadians has diabetes or pre-diabetes.

“Through our clothing donation program, Diabetes Canada is able to support diabetes research and gives children with Type 1 diabetes the opportunity to attend summer camps designed with their needs in mind,” Shannon said in the press release. “Thanks to our generous donors and volunteers we also divert 100 million pounds of clothing and small household items from landfill annually.”

For more information, go here.

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