Letters to the Editor

Smart meters no good

To the Editor,

Re: Dumb leaders attack smart meters, B.C. Views, Oct. 6.

The smart meter program being foisted on us in B.C. is, without a doubt, evil. People are finding that smart meters pose three major problems – huge adverse health impacts, financial costs and loss of privacy.

We are to be exposed to short bursts of high-energy radiation every one to four  minutes, and in some locations, on a continual basis.

The most dangerous area is up to one metre from the meter. The next most dangerous area is within a 30-metre diameter. Avoid sleeping in a room with a meter on the outside wall.

Children up to age 18 and the elderly are most at risk, but in general, three per cent of the population is deemed to be super sensitive to this type of radiation.

In B.C. this amounts to 120,000 people, and another 35 per cent will be moderately affected. Data from California shows a huge spike in leukemia and other diseases. This is just for starters.

The financial costs come from the unnecessary $1 billion installation plus the debt interest charges. Then there will be huge unexplored future health-care costs.

The loss of privacy comes from the fact that these meters will be used for time-of-day billing.

This technology is of absolutely no use to the consumer, no use to the government and can only enrich some in the private sector. The whole exercise makes no sense, is expensive and evil.

People’s safety and rights must come first. Beware of the snake oil salesmen who try to tell you otherwise.

Phil Marchant

Gabriola Island

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