Entertainment

Harbour City author releases Jagged Little Lies

Nanaimo author Lorelie Rozzano released her latest novel, Jagged Little Lies.

The second book in the Jagged series by Rozzano is the story of four people who battle through addiction.

“It’s pretty honest, it’s pretty graphic. It’s pretty true to the experiences I’ve had and seen in this field,” Rozzano said about her newest book.

Not only is Rozzano an author, but she is also a family counsellor at Edgewood Treatment Centre in Nanaimo.

“Addiction isn’t about what you drink, it’s about how you think, behave and feel,” she said.

Over 15 years ago, Rozzano was struggling with addiction when she reached the breaking point. She had no money, no job and barely anyone to support her.

That’s when she decided to seek help at Edgewood.

“There is a lot of stigma and myth out there. I am trying to get the message out there to our young people that it is not cool or glamorous. It’s downright tragic actually,” Rozzano said.

She said that addiction and substance abuse does not discriminate.

“It is genic and it does run in families, but you could be a rocket scientist or a NASCAR driver or a rock star or a hockey player or a homeless guy,” Rozzano said. “What we tend to see is the end result of these addictions,” she said.

Rozzano explained that unlike other medical diseases, addiction is one of the few things that is completely treatable.

“There is a lot of hope,” she said. “If you have to have a disease ... this is the one to have because it is completely treatable, particularly if you get it in the earlier stages.”

The Harbour City author explained that most people are only made aware of the end result of addiction and substance abuse problems. She cites the Downtown Eastside in Vancouver as an example.

“That’s what we think addiction looks like,” she said. “But that’s as far from addiction as you can get. Most people with addiction disorders are functioning in society. They’re at jobs working alongside you and I.”

Her advice to anyone who is considering reaching out to someone who has an addiction problem is to speak to the individual the night after they have overindulged.

“The best time to have a conversation with the person is certainly not while they’re drinking or drugging. It is usually the next morning when they wake up sober and remorseful. Anyone who has overindulged, when they wake up the next they are usually in the most approachable spot.”

To purchase Jagged Little Lies, please visit Amazon.com or click here.

arts@nanaimobulletin.com

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